Lizzie Borden Quarterly by Issue

By Stefani Koorey, Ph.D.

Vol. I, No. 1 – January 1993 to Vol. X, No. 4 – October 2003

Vol. I, No. 1, January 1993

Brody, Howard, M.D. “Author’s Bias Taints Forty Whacks.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.1 (Jan. 1993): 10-11.
Review of Forty Whacks by David Kent in which Brody attempts to prove how Kent was mistaken in his assessment of Lizzie’s guilt. While citing both its strengths and weaknesses, Brody concludes that Brown’s work “ignores some bits of evidence which to my mind tell strongly against his theory.”

Flynn, Robert A. “A Visit to the Borden Home 100 Years Later.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.1 (Jan. 1993): 1, 8-9.
Flynn offers his impressions of his visit to 92 Second Street (renumbered to 230) and makes some case-related observations.

Kent, David. “Lizzie Borden Revisited.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.1 (Jan. 1993): 1-3.
Kent recaps the case.

Schneider, Ada Jill. “A Crime to be Remembered.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.1 (Jan. 1993): 6-7.
Poem about the 1992 Bristol Community College Centennial Conference. Six pictures are included.

Shannon-Valentine, Deborah. “Young Jurors Get to Decide Lizzie’s Fate.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.1 (Jan. 1993): 4
Book review of Be the Judge? Be the Jury? The Lizzie Borden Trial by Doreen Rappaport, a book written for children and allows them to determine the verdict in the case.

Thibault, Edward. “Paying Respect to Lizzie’s Departed Pets.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.1 (Jan. 1993): 5.
Article on Lizzie’s three dogs (Donald Stuart, Royal Nelson, and Laddie Miller) and her purchase of a plot for them at the Pine Ridge Cemetery in Dedhan, Mass.

Vol. I, No. 2, April 1993

Brown, Arnold R. “Letters to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.2 (April 1993): 3.
Two letters to the editor concerning Howard Brody’s review of David Kent’s book Forty Whacks (printed in the previous issue). Brown addresses his strongly worded complaints to both the editor and Mr. Brody.

Corrigan, John C., Jr. “Did the Borden Trial Serve Justice?” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.2 (April 1993): 1, 14.
Corrigan, Governor of the Mass. Academy of Trial Attorneys and chair of the Legal and Forensics section of the Bristol Community College Centennial Conference, evaluates the trial of Lizzie Borden from a legal standpoint.

Donnelly, SMGT Daniel J. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.2 (April 1993): 3.
Supportive letter praising the LBQ for its “fine quality.” Donnelly remarks on the ‘odd looks’ “one gets when mentioning an interest in the Borden case. He says he usually replies that a person interested in the case is “more fascinated with the mystery than the deed.”

Flynn, Robert A. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.2 (April 1993): 4.
Flynn offers the contents of a letter that the late David Kent had writing him soon after he completed Forty Whacks. Says Flynn, Kent “anticipated such a reaction as enumerated by Dr. Brody.”

Marshall, John David. “Edmund Pearson’s Debt to Lizzie.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.2 (April 1993): 6.
Marshall details the literary output of Edmund Pearson and concludes that the author owes a debt to the subject of the Borden murders.

Masterton, William L. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.2 (April 1993): 3-4.
Letter commenting on the Howard Brody review of David Kent’s Forty Whacks, which Masterton feels deserved a better review than the one in the previous issue.

McNamara, M. Ellen, M.D. “Was Lizzie Borden a Victim of Incest?” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.2 (April 1993): 10.
McNamara asserts that Andrew Borden sexually abused his daughter, precipitating her committing the double murder of her father and stepmother.

Morgan, Joanna. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.2 (April 1993): 4.
Letter in which Morgan agrees with those who may feel that there was more than one person involved in the murder of Andrew and Abby Borden.

“‘Not Guilty Cafe’ in Fall River.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.2 (April 1993): 1.
Brief news item reporting that several organizations have joined forces to help save the Central Congregational Church on Rock Street by holding several fundraisers there.

Shannon-Valentine, Deborah. “California Author Intrigued with Lizzie.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.2 (April 1993): 11-12.
A resident of Swansea, Shannon-Valentine offers her review of Ed Sams’ book Lizzie Borden Unlocked!.

Souza, Kenneth J. “Comedy, Music, Mayhem . . . and Murder?” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.2 (April 1993): 13.
Souza reviews the play The Fall River Follies, or Oh Mrs. Churchill. Do Come Over. Someone has Killed Father that premiered in March 1992 at Ohio State University.

Souza, Kenneth J. “Miss Lizzie in the Limelight.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.2 (April 1993): 8-9.
Souza, the editor of the Quarterly, reviews three plays based on the Borden murders: Blood Relations by Sharon Pollock, Emma in Her Mackintosh by Vincent Sessa, and Lizzie! By Owen J. Haskell.

Thibault, Edward. “Professor Starrs’ Boston Lecture.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.2 (April 1993): 2, 7.
Thibault details a humorous lecture given by Professor James Starrs in Boston on the double murder.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “From Fiction to Essay to Humor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.2 (April 1993): 5.
Reviews of “Lizzie Borden Took an Axe” by Robert Bloch, Women Who Kill by Ann Jones, Blood in the Parlor by Dorothy Dunbar, and Bloody Versicles: The Rhymes of Crime by Jonathan Goodman.

Vol. I, No. 3, July 1993

“And the Verdict Is . . .” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.3 (July 1993): 7.
Quarter-page chart that lists the results of a poll conducted at the Bristol Community College’s Centennial Conference on the Lizzie Borden case as to who the participants believed to be the real killer. Not surprisingly, Lizzie was the hands-down winner.

Beeson, Jack. “Lizzie Borden Premieres in Germany.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.3 (July 1993): 1.
Beeson details the development of his opera Lizzie Borden and the changes that the work went through for the German premiere in Oct. 1993 in Hagen. Two changes of note were the adding of grace before dinner and the elimination of any wine drinking.

Bertolet, Maynard. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.3 (July 1993): 3.
Bertolet praises the Quarterly for its outstanding professional look and content.

Bounds, Benny. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.3 (July 1993): 3.
Letter quoting court records and newspaper accounts of the temperature in Fall River on 4 August 1892 and inquiring whether the U.S. Weather Bureau information is correct or not.

Brody, Howard, M.D. “Brown’s Final Chapter: Pro or Con?” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.3 (July 1993): 6-7, 10.
Lengthy review of Arnold Brown’s Lizzie Borden: The Legend, the Truth, the Final Chapter.

Brody, Howard. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.3 (July 1993): 3.
Letter inquiring as to the temperature in Fall River on 4 August 1892, noting that there are great discrepancies in source material.

Caplain, Neilson. “David Kent’s Probing Second Street.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.3 (July 1993): 8.
Review of the printed version of Kent’s play about the Borden murders. Concludes Caplain, “Allowing for writer’s privilege, or poetic license, you are left with a good sense of what took place in the matter of Lizzie Borden some one hundred years ago after reading Slaughter on Second Street.

Cusack, Mary T. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.3 (July 1993): 4.
Letter requesting more articles on Bridget Sullivan, specifically answering several biographical questions posed by Cusack.

Goldstein, Fran. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.3 (July 1993): 3.
Letter praising the Quarterly for its excellence and inquiring whether there will be an article on the left or right-handedness of the killer of Andrew and Abby.

Johnson, Robert T. Jr. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.3 (July 1993): 4.
Letter offering additional biographical details on Alice Russell.

Rebello, Leonard. “The Elusive Alice M. Russell.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.3 (July 1993): 2.
Full-page biographical study of Alice Russell. Includes photograph of Russell’s grave marker at Beech Cove Cemetery in Westport, Ma.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.3 (July 1993): 5.
Reviews of Miss Lizzie Borden by Walter Satterthwait, “Lizzie Borden Took An Axe” in Great American Mysteries by E. Randall Floyd, “Did Lizzie Do It?” in A New England Sampler by Eleanor Early, and Straight Jacket (film) directed by William Castle.

Vol. I, No. 4, October 1993

Bass, Dennis. “Reflections on a Hatchet Head.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.4 (October 1993): 1, 8-9.
Lengthy article that details the events of the Bristol Community College Centennial Conference on the Lizzie Borden case and Bass’ tour of the various sites related to the case in Fall River, Ma.

Bertolet, Maynard, “Lizzie Borden Meets Agnes de Mille.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.4 (October 1993): 4, 7.
Bertolet details the production history of de Mille’s Fall River Legend and the “varied recording history of the music.”

“Borden Booksigning Bonanza.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.4 (October 1993): 6.
Five photographs of Borden authors and experts chatting about the murders at the Barnes & Noble Bookstore in North Dartmouth, MA., on 4 September 1993.

Curry, Judy P. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.4 (October 1993): 4.
Responding to a previous inquiry regarding biographical details of Bridget Sullivan, Curry provides a few facts, including Bridget’s last known address and the names of her parents.

“First-Ever Lizzie Borden Expo.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.4 (October 1993): 7.
Three photographs showing the attendees of the first-ever “Lizzie Borden Expo” held on 10 August 1993 at the Down Under Restaurant in Fall River, MA.

Ryckebusch, Jules R. “From the Publisher’s Desk . . . ” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.4 (October 1993): 3.
Informing the readers of the Quarterly that Arnold Brown has responded with a 26-page letter to Dr. Howard Brody’s review of his book in a previous issue, Ryckebusch summarizes Brown’s key complaints and points of proof.

Ryckebusch, Jules R. “John Giffin’s Riotous Fall River Follies.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.4 (October 1993): 1, 10.
Rousing review of a production of The Fall River Follies by the Contemporary American Theatre Company in Columbus, Ohio.

Thibault, Edward. “That Sticky Weather Issue.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.4 (October 1993): 2, 10.
After reviewing various sources and court documents regarding the temperature on 4 August 1892, Thibault details his mission to “find a definitive answer to the weather conditions.” Quoting newspaper sources, the article concludes that while there was a heat wave the week before the murders, the temperatures on the day of the murders were not higher than 80 degrees.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly I.4 (October 1993): 5.
Reviews of “The Death of a Massachusetts Trojan” in The Chief of Police by Richard Powers, “The Case for Lizzie, or a Theoretical Reconstruction of the Borden Murders” in The Pocket Book of True Crime Stories by Q. Patrick, “The Small Shadow” in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine by Lillian de la Torre, and “Maine Woman Says Lizzie Borden Told Her The Real Killer” in the Providence Journal-Bulletin by Bernard F. Sullivan.

Vol. II, No. 1, January 1994

Bloch, Robert. “Lizzie Borden Took An Axe . . . ” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.1 (January 1994): 8-12.
Reprint of Robert Bloch’s short story on the Lizzie Borden murder case.

Brown, Arnold R. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.1 (January 1994): 3.
Full-page letter by the author of Lizzie Borden: The Legend, the Truth, the Final Chapter in which Brown defends the research and factual content of his work in response to a negative review in a previous issue of the Quarterly.

Caplain, Neilson. “Collector Finds Pearson Cache.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.1 (January 1994): 7.
Caplain details the contents of two letters written by Edmund Pearson that he discovered in his copy of Studies in Murder. A truly fascinating article.

Costello, Timothy. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.1 (January 1994): 4.
Costello asks if the Quarterly could print photographs of the inside of each room of 92 Second Street near the time of the murders, in order to “get a glimpse of the world the Bordens lived in daily.”

Masterton, William L. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.1 (January 1994): 4.
Writing to defend Arnold Brown’s right to address Howard Brody’s criticism of his book, Masterton asks the Quarterly to consider printing most of his 26-page letter using Masterton’s suggested cuts.

“Miss Lizzie Makes the Rounds.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.1 (January 1994): 6.
Full-page essay that explores several references to Lizzie Borden in a variety of media, including appearances in cartoons, the rock music world, and a book about famous graves.

Plourde, Rosemary. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.1 (January 1994): 4.
Plourde offers her idea for consideration that perhaps Andrew had murdered his first wife, Sarah Borden, and that Lizzie and Emma may had discovered something incriminating during the daylight robbery, and had plotted to murder the father and step-mother as a way to not only avenge their mother’s murder, but to inherit the money that was due them.

Rebello, Leonard. “The Long-Lost Porter.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.1 (January 1994): 2, 13.
Lengthy biographical sketch of Edwin H. Porter, author of The Fall River Tragedy.

Souza, Kenneth J. “Knowlton Papers to be Published in 1994.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.1 (January 1994): 1, 14.
Details regarding the Fall River Historical Society’s publication of the Knowlton Papers, including specifics as to the collection, its contents, and the process of organizing the letters and other documents to ready them for publication.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.1 (January 1994): 5.
Reviews of Lizzie! A Play in Two Acts by Owen Haskell, “Was Lizzie Borden Guilty?” in The Astrologer Looks at Murder by Barbara H. Watters, “Lizzie Borden” in On Trial: Seven Intriguing Cases of Capital Crime by Elwyn Jones, “Book Reviews by Dorothy Parker” in Lizzie Borden: The Untold Story by Dorothy Parker, and A Pictorial History of the American Theatre by Daniel Blum.

Vol. II, No. 2, Spring 1994

Banville, Cheryl. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.2 (Spring 1994): 3.
Brief letter in which Banville writes that she is interested in the Lizzie Borden murder case because it is unsolved.

Hennessy, Tom. “Lizzie Borden, 1994.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.2 (Spring 1994): 9.
Thirteen-stanza poem that has the same cadence as the doggerel “Lizzie Borden Took An Axe.”

Salvaggio, David W. “A Borden Buff’s Theory on the Crime.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.2 (Spring 1994): 6-8.
After offering a recounting of the incidents in the murder, Salvaggio concludes that “Lizzie Borden was a miserable and lonely lesbian, tangled in the Victorian web of the late nineteenth century; caught in a man’s world long before women’s suffrage. A kleptomaniac obsessed with material ism, she could no longer bear the frugal father who thwarted the lavish life she desired. . . . With no college education, no job skills, and no husband, only her father’s vast estate could provide the freedom and comfort for which she so desperately longed.”

Souza, Kenneth J. “Lizzie Makes for Perfect Crime Drama.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.2 (Spring 1994): 1, 10.
Profile of playwright Tim Kelly, the author of Lizzie Borden of Fall River.

Thibault, Edward. “Poison, Porter and Postcards.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.2 (Spring 1994): 2, 9.
Thibault disputes two statements that have made their way into Lizzie lore: that Lizzie attempted to buy some prussic acid from Eli Bence (Thibault points out that the wife of a police inspector was on a “crusade against the illegal sale of drugs by local drug stores” and was mistaken for Lizzie), and that Emma turned to Lizzie before the dress burning incident to ask her what she was planning to do (Thibault says the floor plan makes this an impossibility). Additionally, he refutes two items relating to Emma Borden: the “master control light panel” that she supposedly had installed in her Newmarket, NH home (it was only an ordinary set of wall switches), and that Emma did in fact leave Fall River to travel abroad (in 1906 to Scotland).

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.2 (Spring 1994): 5.
Reviews of “Could a Woman Do That?” in Guilty or Innocent? By Anita Gustafson, “The Ma & Pa Murders” in Great Unsolved Crimes by Louis Solomon, “Lizzie Borden: A Street Ballad” in How to Become Absurdly Well-Informed About the Famous and Infamous by Phyllis Parker, “Lizzie Borden” in Human Monsters: An Illustrated Guide of the World’s Most Vicious Murders by David Everitt, and Visions and Prophecies by Time-Life books.

Vol. II, No. 3, Summer 1994

Adilz, Fritz. “An Armchair Solution to the Borden Mystery.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.3 (Summer 1994): 11-12.
Part one of Adilz’s solution to the Lizzie Borden murder case. His theory is based on these two assumptions: “Lizzie was guilty” and “Lizzie could not have killed with her own hands.”

Brown, Arnold R. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.3 (Summer 1994): 2.
Brown responds to a previous article in the Quarterly by Edward Thibault in which he disputes Lizzie having attempted to purchase prussic acid from Eli Bence and instead, was mistaken for the real customer, a wife of a police officer who was trying to make a point of illegal drug dispensing by local pharmacies. Brown quotes Bence’s testimony in the Preliminary Hearing as identifying Lizzie by sight not by voice. Brown additionally states that he has proof positive (vital statistic records, asylum records, church records, and a studio photograph) that Billy Borden did, in fact, exist.

Caplain, Neilson. “Now Presiding, Judge Josiah C. Blaisdell.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.3 (Summer 1994): 13.
Biographical sketch of Judge Blaisdell who presided at Lizzie’s inquest, arraignment, and preliminary hearing. Included is a photograph of Blaisdell’s grave plot at Oak Grove Cemetery in Fall River.

“The Commonwealth of Massachusetts vs. Lizzie A Borden: The Knowlton Papers: 1892-1893.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.3 (Summer 1994): 9-10.
Two-page ad for The Knowlton Papers, announcing the publication by the Fall River Historic Society and details on how to order a copy.

Curry, Judy P. “A Closer Look at Actress Nance O’Neil.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.3 (Summer 1994): 4-5.
Lengthy biographical piece on Lizzie’s actress friend, Nance O’Neil.

Plourde, Rosemary. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.3 (Summer 1994): 2.
Letter in support of Arnold Brown’s lengthy response to Howard Brody and his “15 Questions” posed to Brown in his review of Brown’s book. Plourde appeals to the Quarterly to allow Brown the opportunity to respond in detail to the charges and questions leveled at him.

“The Second Annual Lizzie Borden Expo.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.3 (Summer 1994): 7-8.
Schedule of Events for the Lizzie Borden Expo sponsored by the Down Under Restaurant and the Lizzie Borden Quarterly.

“Second Street Owner Passes Away.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.3 (Summer 1994): 1.
Obituary for Josephine V. McGinn, who along with her husband John were the long-time owners of 92 Second Street.

Souza, Kenneth J. “Knowlton Collection is a Priceless Resource.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.3 (Summer 1994): 1, 14.
Highly favorable review of the The Knowlton Papers published by the Fall River Historical Society that Souza finds “the most important” book every published on the case to date.

Vol. II, No. 4/5, Fall/Winter 1995

Adilz, Fritz. “An Armchair Solution to the Borden Mystery.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.4/5 (Fall/Winter 1995): 12-13.
Part two of Adilz’s solution to the Lizzie Borden murder case. His theory is based on these two assumptions: “Lizzie was guilty” and “Lizzie could not have killed with her own hands.”

Bounds, Benny. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.4/5 (Fall/Winter 1995): 2.
Lengthy letter in which Bounds relates the complete text of “Hame, Hame, Hame,” a poem by Scottish poet Allan Cunningham, containing the words “My Ain Countree.”

Curry, Judy P. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.4/5 (Fall/Winter 1995): 2.
Curry writes to complain that her previously printed article on Nance O’Neil was edited so as to make her facts incorrect.

Fletcher, Paul. “Lizzie’s Tilden-Thurber ‘Confession’.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.4/5 (Fall/Winter 1995): 8-9.
A two-page retelling of the “Tilden-Thurber” event from later in Lizzie’s life in which she was accused of shoplifting two small paintings and subsequently signing a confession for the murders of her father and step-mother in exchange for keeping the affair secret. Fletcher, among others, believes the confession to be forged, and in fact there is documentary evidence by noted graphologists and handwriting experts that her signature was forged.

Flynn, Robert A. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.4/5 (Fall/Winter 1995): 2.
Flynn writes to complain that The Country Lawyer: Lizzie Borden Took An Axe?, that appeared on the Discovery Channel on 18 September 1994 “was a disappointment” and makes a plea for “someone to produce a classic documentary on the case.”

Keller, Jon N. “The Mysterious William S. Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.4/5 (Fall/Winter 1995): 15-17.
Keller recounts his attempts to research and examine the claims made by Arnold Brown in his book Lizzie Borden: The Legend, the Truth, the Final Chapter, including the existence of Andrew’s illegitimate son William S. Keller concludes the evidence is lacking to support his theory of William being related to Andrew this way, but offers that he could understand how Brown was lead to believe that there has been “a cover-up and conspiracy” in the Borden murder case.

“New Lizzie Play Premiered Last Fall.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.4/5 (Fall/Winter 1995): 1.
Article that details the production of Eric Stedman’s play The Testimony of Lizzie Borden, “an adult docu-mystery based on the events of August 4, 1892.”

Quigley, George E. “The Borden Maid: Myths and Legends.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.4/5 (Fall/Winter 1995): 6, 16.
Quigley offers some biographical material on Borden maid Bridget Sullivan, disputing previously printed documentation regarding her life and whereabouts following the murders in 1892. Unfortunately, several of his mathematical calculations are incorrect, marring an otherwise interesting read.

“Reader’s Survey Results.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.4/5 (Fall/Winter 1995): 4.
Results of the survey conducted by the Quarterly on various questions related to the case or the study of the case.

“The Second Annual Lizzie Borden Expo, Saturday and Sunday, August 6-7, 1994.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.4/5 (Fall/Winter 1995): 10-11.
Two-page photo spread of seven images of the participants and events of the expo held in Fall River.

Thibault, Edward. “Understanding the Trickey-McHenry Affair.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.4/5 (Fall/Winter 1995): 7, 14.
An extensive examination of the famous “Boston Globe Scandal” involving reporter Henry Trickey and private detective Edwin McHenry, in which a hoax was perpetrated by the two to publish outlandish reports relating to the Borden murders as if factual accountings.

Wilkerson, Michael. “Lizbeth of Maplecroft.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.4/5 (Fall/Winter 1995): 11.
Four-stanza poem of Lizzie’s life after her move to Maplecroft.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.4/5 (Fall/Winter 1995): 5.
Reviews of “Lizzie Borden Took An Axe: History, Feminism and American Culture” in Annals of Scholarship by Ann Schofield, Guillaume Chequespierre and the Oise Salon by John Hulme, “Hatchet-Job Heiress” in Wild Women: Crusaders, Curmudgeons and Completely Corsetless Ladies in the Otherwise Virtuous Victorian Era by August Stephen, Bizarre Murders by Gilda Berger and Melvin Berger, and “Lizzie Borden and the Murders” in Three Rousing Cheers by Elizabeth Jordan.

Vol. II, No. 6, Winter 1995

Abraham, Sue. “The Pitfalls of Being a Lizzie Buff, or, The August Bash Can’t Come Too Soon.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.6 (Winter 1995): 12-13.
Abraham relates her recent trip to Fall River and visits to various locations related to the crimes and Lizzie Borden. Included is a photograph of Lizzie’s grave marker.

Adilz, Fritz. “An Armchair Solution to the Borden Mystery.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.6 (Winter 1995): 4-6.
Part three of Adilz’s solution to the Lizzie Borden murder case. His theory is based on these two assumptions: “Lizzie was guilty” and “Lizzie could not have killed with her own hands.”

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.6 (Winter 1995): 9-10.
Interesting article covering several topics, including “The Enigmatic Miss Sullivan,” “Victoria Trivia, ” and “Andrew Borden’s Coat.”

Champlin, Kenneth M. “The Shadows Have Fallen and They Wait for the Day.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.6 (Winter 1995): 15.
Full-page article on Champlin’s visit to the Oak Grove Cemetery. Included is a large photograph of the Fall River Oak Grove Cemetery archway.

Curry, Judy P. “Trials of the Century.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.6 (Winter 1995): 11.
Curry examines the parallels between the Lizzie Borden trial and the trial of O.J. Simpson for the murder of his former wife Niclole and Ron Goldman.

Hogan, Nancy L’enz. “Fall River Summer, 1892.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.6 (Winter 1995): 8.
Full-page poem about Lizzie Borden and the murders in Fall River.

“Jack Beeson’s Lizzie Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.6 (Winter 1995): 7.
Full-page ad for the CD of original cast recording from the 1965 world premiere production of the opera Lizzie Borden by Jack Beeson. An order form and details of the special pricing available to subscribers of the Quarterly is included.

Ulrich, William. “The Carvings of Maplecroft.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.6 (Winter 1995): 1-3.
Article devoted to the house on the hill that Lizzie and Emma moved to following Lizzie’s acquittal. Ulrich also details his search for the source of the poem that was carved on a panel above the fireplace. Included is a full reprint of the poem “My Ain Countrie.”

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly II.6 (Winter 1995): 14.
Reviews of The Lizzie Borden Trial by Doreen Rappaport, “Hack Work or Hatchet Job?: Lizzie Borden and the Case That Would Not Close” from the Village Voice by Walter Kendrick, “The Unfathomable Borden Riddle” in Mysterious New England by John U. Ayotte, and “Lizzie Borden Trial: 1893” in Great American Trials by Stephen G. Christianson.

Vol. III, No. 1, January 1996

Adilz, Fritz. “An Armchair Solution to the Borden Mystery.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.1 (January 1996): 7-10, 14-15.
Part four of Adilz’s solution to the Lizzie Borden murder case. His theory is based on these two assumptions: “Lizzie was guilty” and “Lizzie could not have killed with her own hands.” Accompanying the text is a large photograph of Emma Borden.

Argus, Glenn E. “Victoria’s Private Disgrace.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.1 (January 1996): 12.
Argus disputes the story, found on page 316 of Victoria Lincoln’s Private Disgrace, that Lizzie was not in her coffin, that she was not carried off by “black men the night before,” and that “her burial at Oak Grove Cemetery was not unusual at all.”

Brody, Howard. “The Borden Case and the Irrelevance of Reason.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.1 (January 1996): 4, 12.
Brody discusses the phenomena that he encountered at the Centennial Conference on the Borden case at Bristol Community College whereby participants expressed their wish that the crimes would never be solved because it would ruin the fun of the mystery.

Brown, Arnold R. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.1 (January 1996): 2.
Brief letter announcing that the legal hurdles that had stood in the way of Brown publishing his latest book on Lizzie Borden are ended and his hopes that it will be released by the following August. (NOTE: this book never was completed before Brown’s death.)

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits: The Handleless Hatchet.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.1 (January 1996): 6.
Caplain presents testimony and evidence supporting his belief that the handleless hatchet was not, in fact, the murder weapon that was used in the killing of Andrew and Abby Borden.

Grenier, Margaret Judge. “Borden 1893/Simpson 1995 Case Similarities.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.1 (January 1996): 5, 15.
Grenier focuses her study on the similarities between the Lizzie Borden and O.J. Simpson trials on “the strong polarity of feelings about the guilt or innocence surrounding the accused.” Included is a photograph of the jury at Lizzie’s trial.

Stedman, Eric. “Lizzie Borden ‘Testifies’ in Fall River.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.1 (January 1996): 1, 12-14.
Lengthy piece on Stedman’s experience in bringing The Testimony of Lizzie Borden to Fall River in September 1995. Included are interesting details of the staging of the play in accordance to inquest, preliminary hearing, and trial testimony, as well as crime scene photographs. Of note is Stedman’s belief (based on blood stain evidence and autopsy reports) that Andrew must have been struck from the front and not over the left-hand side of the arm of the couch as is believed. A photo of the cast on the steps of 92 Second Street accompany the text.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.1 (January 1996): 11-12.
Reviews of The Mystery Unveiled by Todd Lunday, “Lizzie Borden” in Unsolved Murders & Mysteries by Henry Lester, Victoria Vistas: Fall River 1886-1900 by Philip T. Silvia, “Lizzie Borden: Her Life After the Murders” from Spectator by Walter Mitchell, and “The Lizzie Borden Song” in Masterpieces of Murder by Michael Brown.

Vol. III, No. 2, April 1996

Adilz, Fritz. “An Armchair Solution to the Borden Mystery.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.2 (April 1996): 6-8.
Final installment of Adilz’s solution to the Lizzie Borden murder case. His theory is based on these two assumptions: “Lizzie was guilty” and “Lizzie could not have killed with her own hands.”

Bertolet, Maynard F. and Lisa Zawadzki. “Spotlight on Lisa Zawadzki.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.2 (April 1996): 5.
Profile of the author of the regular column “Bibliographic Borden” in the LBQ.

Brody, Howard. “Of Armchairs and Books: A Response to Fritz Adilz.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.2 (April 1996): 8.
While acknowledging that Adilz’s essay on his theories regarding the Lizzie Borden murder case is well considered and “a model that future authors about the Borden crimes will choose to emulate,” Brody asserts that he finds “the Adilz narrative improbable.”

Brown, Arnold R. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.2 (April 1996): 3.
Brown asserts “beyond any shadow of a doubt” that John Morse was “a before-the-fact conspirator with Miss Lizzie” but that the collusion was “to insure the temporary removal of Mrs. Borden from the house on Second Street.”

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.2 (April 1996): 13.
Article that briefly covers several topics, including a note that there was a book entitled Crime of the Century previous to the Borden trial, that the year 1892 had some memorable and bizarre homicides besides those in Fall River, and the Pearson/Roughead connection.

Flynn, Robert A. “Lizzie Borden Panel Discussion and Booksigning.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.2 (April 1996): 10.
Flynn reports on the Lizzie Borden panel discussion and book signing at the Book People Book Store in Austin, Texas, on 27 January 1996. A photograph of Flynn with “Liz” Carpenter and Joyce G. Williams accompanies the text.

“Glimmerglass Opera.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.2 (April 1996): 15.
Half-page advertisement for the Glimmerglass Opera of Cooperstown, NY, 1996 festival season which includes a production of Jack Beeson’s Lizzie Borden.

Hogan, Nancy L’enz. “Different Strokes for Different Folks.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.2 (April 1996): 5.
Twenty-line tongue-in-cheek poem about deferring to one’s parents instead of resorting to chopping them to death

Jabens, Harley. “Lizzie on the Internet!” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.2 (April 1996): 10.
Press release from the Austin American-Statesman of 25 January 1996, announcing the Lizzie Borden panel discussion and book signing at Book People in Austin, Texas, on 17 January 1996.

McGinn, Martha. “The Lizzie Borden Bed & Breakfast Museum.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.2 (April 1996): 14-15
Article announcing the opening of 92 Second Street as a Bed and Breakfast and includes details as to the organization of the spaces made into guest rooms and common areas. Two photographs of the outside of the house (then and now) accompany the text.

Noe, Denise. “An Armchair Solution to the Lizzie Borden Mystery, A Review.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.2 (April 1996): 9.
Negative review of Fritz Adilz’s four-part series in the LBQ entitled “An Armchair Solution to the Lizzie Borden Mystery.” Concludes Noe, “Once he starts writing about Davis and the nameless, faceless phantom who helped him get away, Adilz is no longer theorizing, but fictionalizing. He has left broth behind and is serving up balderdash.”

O’Dwyer, Richard. “Bridget Sullivan, Before and After.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.2 (April 1996): 1, 11-12.
Genealogist O’Dwyer, an expert in the Beara Peninsula in Ireland where Bridget Sullivan was born, provides a detailed family history of the elusive Sullivan. Included is a photograph of Allihes Mine, Townland of Billerough, Parish of Allihes, Beara Peninsula, County Cork, Ireland (the Townland where Bridget Sullivan was born and lived her first nineteen years).

Viste, Ron and Kathy. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.2 (April 1996): 3.
Letter inquiring as to if there are any plans in Fall River to commemorate the murder in the upcoming month of August.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.2 (April 1996): 4.
Reviews of Crime: An Encyclopedia by Oliver Cyriax, The Long Arm by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, American Murder Ballads and Their Stories by Olive Woolley Burt, and “Fall River Legend” in A Sense of History: The Best Writing From the Pages of American Heritage by Judson D. Hale.

Vol. III, No. 3, July 1996

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.3 (July 1996): 5, 18.
Article that briefly covers several topics, including a discussion on the names of principles in the case, a new story that Lizzie had thrown a cat down a well as a child, Agnes de Mille’s mention on page 35 of her book that the town clock in Fall River was known to be off by ten minutes, that Colin Wilson thinks Lizzie washed the blood-stained hatchet in the barn and then broke it in half, that Frank Spiering is incorrect in his book regarding “the Fall River Line of steamships zigzagging up and down the Quequechan River,” and points out several instances of “fantasy” in Arnold Brown’s book on the murders.

Champlin, Kenneth M. “Some Other Bordens.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.3 (July 1996): 1, 14-17.
Champlin provides an extensive commentary and a two-page genealogical chart on the life and ancestors of Lizzie Borden. A large photograph of Lizzie c. 1877 accompanies the text.

“Coming Events.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.3 (July 1996): 19.
Full-page listing of several upcoming Lizzie-related events, including the Glimmerglass Opera production of Lizzie Borden, the 4th Annual Lizzie Borden Expo in Fall River, a production of Lizzie by Owen Haskell, the opening of the Lizzie Borden Bed & Breakfast, and the production of Blood Relations by the Little Theatre of Fall River.

Cusack, Mary T. “Spotlight on Mary T. Cusack.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.3 (July 1996): 6.
Biographical article on the cartoonist for the LBQ who contributes the “Princess Maplecroft” drawings each issue. A photograph of Cusack accompanies the text.

Hoffman, Paul Dennis. “Using Lizzie in the Classroom.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.3 (July 1996): 3, 18.
Hoffman offers suggestions for using the Lizzie Borden murder trial to assist in teaching students about the gilded age, yellow journalism, and the complex nature of the legal system. He additionally suggests ways to incorporate source material and books on the subject into the curriculum..

Schley-Ulrich, William. “Sherlock Holmes and the Lizzie Borden Connection: Part One.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.3 (July 1996): 8-13.
Fictionalized account of Sherlock Holmes investigating the Borden murders in Fall River, Massachusetts in 1892.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.3 (July 1996): 4.
Reviews of “Just Like O.J.’s Trial, But Without Kato” from American Journalism Review by William J. Eaton, “The Long Silence of Lizzie Borden” from Yankee by Don Weafer, and A Private Disgrace: Lizzie Borden by Daylight by Victoria Lincoln.

Vol. III, No. 4, October 1996

Bates, David. “The Most Sensational Homicide?” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.4 (October 1996): 6, 19.
Bates focuses his exploration of the similarities between the Lizzie Borden and O.J. Simpson trials on “the unusual stature of the defendants.”

Bertolet, Maynard. “Honoring Mrs. Florence Cook Brigham.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.4 (October 1996): 1, 14-17.
Lengthy biographical essay and interview with Mrs. Florence Cook Brigham, past curator of the Fall River Historical Society. Several photographs of Brigham (as a young woman and now) accompany the text.

“A Birthday Party for Lizzie!” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.4 (October 1996): 7.
Report of the birthday party in honor of Lizzie Borden held on 19 July 1996 at the Lizzie Borden Bed & Breakfast. Photos of Martha McGinn and Ron Evans (co-owners of 92 Second Street) and the cast of characters at the party accompany the text.

Brown, Arnold R. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.4 (October 1996): 13.
Full-page letter by Mr. Brown written in response to Neilson Caplain’s “Lizbits” column in the July 1996 issue of the LBQ. Brown addresses Caplain’s complaints to his work.

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.4 (October 1996): 5.
Caplain explores two topics in this column: Second Street inhabitants in 1892 and modern novels that include references to the Lizzie Borden murder case.

“Finally – The Real Truth.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.4 (October 1996): 7.
Brief anonymous tongue-in-cheek accounting of the murders as a simple misunderstanding.

Flynn, Robert A. “Fact or Fantasy: In Defense of Nance O’Neil.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.4 (October 1996): 19.
Flynn reprints excerpts from an article published on 4 June 1927 by Minna Littmann. It is an interview with Nance O’Neil that shows that brings to light some interesting facts regarding Nance’s relationship with Lizzie.

Flynn, Robert A. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.4 (October 1996): 2.
Flynn suggests a regular column in the LBQ entitled “Truth or Nonsense” or “Fact Versus Fiction” to help separate the conjecture and pure nonsense from the true facts of the case.

Masterton, William L. “Thousands of Solutions to the Borden Mystery Lost Forever.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.4 (October 1996): 18.
Half-page essay in which Masterton reports that more than 60,000 entries to a contest conducted by Liberty magazine in 1929 to solve ten unsolved murders, including the Borden case, were received but discarded.

Noe, Denise. “Echoes of Lizzie in Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.4 (October 1996): 18.
Noe notes the similarities between the Lizzie Borden murder case and the film Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte (1965).

Schley-Ulrich, William. “Sherlock Holmes and the Lizzie Borden Connection: Part Two.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.4 (October 1996): 8-12.
Second installment of the fictionalized account of Sherlock Holmes investigating the Borden murders in Fall River, Massachusetts in 1892.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly III.4 (October 1996): 4.
Reviews of “Inn Cold Blood” from People Weekly, “I Am the Murderer” from the Pawtuxet Valley Daily Times, “Lizzie Borden’s Trial Revisited” from the Tennessee Bar Journal by Donald F. Paine, “Borden Case” in Crime and Criminals by Nick Vandome, and Masterpieces of Murder by Edmund Pearson, edited by Gerald Gross.

Vol. IV, No. 1, January 1997

Bertolet, Maynard. “Premiere Publication Event.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.1 (January 1997): 9.
Printing of the United States Signal Service report for Fall River that shows the meteorological record for the month of August 1892. The report shows that 4 August 1892 was not a hot day as had been believed, but a relatively moderate one.

Brake, Allen J. “Lizzie Borden: Hash and Rehash.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.1 (January 1997): 18.
Positive review of a thirty-minute documentary by Immy Humes (entitled Hash and Rehash) on the Borden trial that the reviewer calls “well-made, nicely-edited, informative, and above all, entertaining.”

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.1 (January 1997): 5.
Caplain provides a summary of the contents of his vast Lizzie Borden collection and, in closing, offers an apology to Arnold Brown for his previous comments about Brown’s book.

Curry, Judith Paula. “Cousin Grace Harley Howe.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.1 (January 1997): 1, 16-17.
Biographical essay on Lizzie’s cousin and friend in later life, Grace Hartley Howe. A photograph of Howe with her husband Louis McHenry Howe and Hartley Howe accompanies the text.

Evans, Stewart P. “Letters to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.3 (July 1997): 3.
Evans, a resident of England, details the location of several known copies of Porter’s The Fall River Tragedy in response to a previous article in the Quarterly by William Schley-Ulrich which contains a reference to the rarity of the Porter book.

Hoffman, Paul Dennis. “That Elusive Hatchet: Part One of Two: ‘The Hatchet – Yes.'” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.1 (January 1997): 3, 19.
Hoffman discusses how the hatchet used as the murder weapon of Andrew and Abby may have found its way into the house before the murders took place. A large photo of the handleless hatchet (which now resides in the Fall River Historical Society) accompanies the text.

Masterton, William L. “Weather We Do: Some Like It Hot!” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.1 (January 1997): 7-8.
After quoting various authors on the Lizzie Borden case that all claim that the day of the murders was a very hot one, Masterton uses three sources (the Fall River Daily Herald, the Fall River Evening News, and the United States Signal Service) to prove that the temperature was not over 78 degrees when Andrew was murdered.

Schley-Ulrich, William. “Sherlock Holmes and the Lizzie Borden Connection: Part Two.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.1 (January 1997): 10-15.
Conclusion of the fictionalized account of Sherlock Holmes investigating the Borden murders in Fall River, Massachusetts in 1892.

Schley-Ulrich, William. “Weather We Don’t: Just How Hot Was It?” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.1 (January 1997): 6, 8.
Article quoting weather reports from the Fall River Herald of 4 August, 1892, as well as trial testimony regarding the temperature that day. He closes his essay with the following questions: “Did the players in the legend of Lizzie testify truthfully about the weather, or were they so influenced by the prosecution that they deviated from the truth?”

Troost, Kathleen. “Those Whacky Bordens.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.1 (January 1997): 18.
Nine-stanza poem (based on the rhythms of the doggerel “Lizzie Borden Took an Axe”) that has Bridget and Emma committing the murders and Lizzie taking the fall.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.1 (January 1997): 4.
Reviews of “The ‘Lizzie Borden’ Sign of Increased Intracranial Pressure in Infants” from Clinical Nuclear Medicine, The Borden Murders: An Annotated Bibliography by Robert A. Flynn, “Lizzie Borden: Gave Her Parents Eighty-One Whacks” in The Chronicle of Crime by Martin Fido, and “We Gather Together” from Yankee by Tim Clark and Victor Juhasz.

Vol. IV, No. 2, April 1997

Adilz, Fritz. “An Armchair Solution to the Borden Mystery: Some Clarifications and Modifications—Part One.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.2 (April 1997): 10-14.
Citing “ample circumstantial evidence,” Adilz offers the details of his theory that Lizzie had conspired with her uncle John Morse in the killing of Andrew and Abby Borden.

Bertolet, Jeannine H. “Pictures of Lizzie Things.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.2 (April 1997): 15.
Collection of 5 photographs of the opening of 92 Second Street to the public.

Bertolet, Maynard. “Erratum: An Apology to Mr. William Schley-Ulrich.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.2 (April 1997): 9.
Editor of the Quarterly, Bertolet reprints portions of the testimony of John Morse and Lizzie Borden that was unintentionally missing from Schley-Ulrich’s article of Jan. 1997.

Caplain, Neilson. “Chronology of the Lizzie Borden Murder Case.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.2 (April 1997): 5-7.
In this part one of two, Caplain lists “a chronological list of dates, times and events associated with the Andrew Jackson Borden family and the Borden axe-murders.”

Flynn, Robert A. “Fact or Fantasy: The Jefferson Borden Mutiny in Relation to the Borden Murders.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.2 (April 1997): 9.
Brief essay in which Flynn proves that the mutiny on board the schooner Jefferson Borden on 20 April 1875 had no connection to the Borden murders. Flynn discovered that, contrary to speculation, Andrew Borden was not part-owner of the ship, and in fact, has no connection to it, either legally or financially.

Hoffman, Paul Dennis. “That Elusive Hatchet. Part Two of Two: ‘The Hatchet—No.'” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.2 (April 1997): 3, 19.
Hoffman casts doubt on the ‘handleless hatchet’ as the true murder weapon, citing Robert Flynn’s research in this area.

Knowlton, General William (ret.). “What’s In a Name?: Hosea Knowlton for the Prosecution.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.2 (April 1997): 1, 16-19.
Written by the grandson of Hosea, this articles details the life and times of the prosecuting attorney in the Lizzie Borden murder trial.

Snell, David. “The Route of Hand to Helve.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.2 (April 1997): 8.
Snell looks at the motive, means, and opportunity of Lizzie having committed the double murder of her father and stepmother, and concludes that her choice of a hatchet as a murder weapon was a “masterfully clever selection.”

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.2 (April 1997): 4.
Reviews of “Lizzie Borden” in Lady Killers: 100 Tales of Passion, Revenge and Despair by Joyce Robins, “Lizzie Andrew Borden: the Logic of Justification” in The Logic of Women on Trial: Case Studies of Popular American Trials by Janice E. Schuetz, “Was Lizzie Borden the Victim of Incest? from Rhode Island Medicine by M. Eileen McNamara, and Tad Tuleja’s “Lizzie Borden” from The New York Public Library Book of Popular Americana.

Vol. IV, No. 3, July 1997

Adilz, Fritz. “An Armchair Solution to the Borden Mystery: Some Clarifications and Modifications—Conclusion.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.3 (July 1997): 10-14.
Final installment of Adilz’s theory that Lizzie and John Morse conspired to kill Andrew and Abby Borden.

Bertolet, Maynard. “The Fall River Historical Society Restoration.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.3 (July 1997): 1, 16-17.
Bertolet details the restoration and opening of the restored Fall River Historical Society. Of note are the details and photographs regarding the Borden displays among other highlights.

Brown, Arnold R. “Strange Behavior of John Vinnicum Morse.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.3 (July 1997): 15.
Brief essay in which Brown details Morse’s journey on the evening of the murders.

Caplain, Neilson. “Chronology of the Lizzie Borden Murder Case.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.3 (July 1997): 5-9.
In this part two of two, Caplain concludes his “chronological list of dates, times and events associated with the Andrew Jackson Borden family and the Borden axe-murders.” This part begins with 11:00 A.M on the day of the murders.

Noe, Denise. “Lizzie Borden and the Spinster Mystique.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.3 (July 1997): 15.
Brief article examining the stereotyped notion of spinsterhood and its relationship to our modern understanding of Lizzie Borden, the unmarried woman.

“The Proof is in the Pudding.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.3 (July 1997): 19.
Reprints of the Fall River Water Department Records of 1874-1878, meter reading reports on the Borden house, and Borden and Almy’s application for water, showing that, perhaps, Andrew was not quite the extreme miser he has been made out to be.

Rimer, Jane. “Lizzie Makes the Grade.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.3 (July 1997): 14.
Rimer details her experiences in attending the Centennial Conference in 1992 and includes a syndicated cartoon of the Lizzie Borden Quarterly being delivered to a mail box with Lizzie’s name on it.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.3 (July 1997): 4, 18.
Reviews of A Gallery of Rogues: Portraits in True Crime by Michael Kurland, The Alyson Almanac, A Bloody Legacy: Chronicles of American Murder by Mark Sabljak and Martin H. Greenberg, “A Wasp Looks at Lizzie Borden” from the National Review by Florence King, and “Eerie Events in an Old House on Durfee Street” from the Fall River Herald News by Fred Rhines.

Vol. IV, No. 4, October 1997

Adler, Gabriela Schalow. “Edmund Pearson and the Transformation of Biography Into Legend.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.4 (October 1997): 1, 13-16.
Lengthy essay on Edmund Pearson, author of The Trial of Lizzie Borden and several smaller works on the Lizzie Borden murder case, that investigates his part in “turning the woman into a (haunting) criminal, something the jurdicial [sic] process failed to do.”

Bertolet, Maynard. “Could it Be? A Second Borden Murder Trial?” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.4 (October 1997): 12.
Article reporting the retrial of the Lizzie Borden murder case by the Stanford Law School, with the Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court presiding, along with an Associate Justice.

Binette, Dennis A. “Introduction to the Edmund Lester Pearson/Frank Knowlton Correspondence.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.4 (October 1997): 7-8.
Binette describes the collection of letters to be printed in sections in the LBQ, courtesy of the Fall River Historical Society.

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.4 (October 1997): 5, 19.
Interesting biographical essay on Victoria Lincoln, native of Fall River and author of A Private Disgrace. Also included is a short piece on Andrew’s stinginess, citing Water Department Records that while Lizzie’s father did add water to the house, it was “installed only in the sink at the back door entry and in the basement water closet, never on the second floor or in any other place in the house.” In addition, Caplain notes that in all the 18 years they owned the house on 92 Second Street that Andrew made no additions or improvements of any kind.

“The Edmund Lester Pearson/Frank Knowlton Correspondence.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.4 (October 1997): 7-11.
Part I of the reprint of the correspondence between Pearson and Frank Knowlton (Letters 1-7) regarding the Lizzie Borden case. Printed courtesy of the Fall River Historical Society.

Noe, Denise. “Sherlock Holmes and the Fall River Tragedy.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.4 (October 1997): 6.
Positive review of Owen Haskell’s book Sherlock Holmes and the Fall River Tragedy that Noe calls “a good read and should provide both Holmes fans and Borden buffs with an afternoon’s diversion.”

Schley-Ulrich, William. “Porter’s Fall River Tragedy: How Rare?” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.4 (October 1997): 3, 17-19.
Essay that disputes the popular tale that Lizzie purchased and burned all but twenty-five copies of The Fall River Tragedy after it was published, showing well over 40 copies present and accounted for.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.4 (October 1997): 4.
Reviews of “Lizzie Borden and Her Forty Whacks” in New England’s Most Sensational Murders by Marc Songini, “Borden Case” in The Murderer’s Who’s Who by J.H.H. Gaute and Robin Odell, and “The House of Lizzie Borden” in Jogging Around New England by Charles Hanson Towne.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “Sherlock Holmes and the Fall River Tragedy.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly IV.4 (October 1997): 6.
Positive review of Owen Haskell’s book Sherlock Holmes and the Fall River Tragedy which Zawadzki praises for being “an enjoyable read.”

Vol. V, No. 1, January 1998

Bertolet, Maynard. “John Vinnicum Morse; Obituary; A Photograph; ‘I Sat On His Lap.'” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.1 (Jan. 1998): 3, 10.

“Calling Card of Miss Lizbeth A. Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.1 (Jan. 1998): 9.
Reprint of the Lizzie’s calling card, courtesy of the Fall River Historical Society.

Caplain, Neilson. “The Buffintons and the House Next Door.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.1 (Jan. 1998): 5, 19.
Caplain charts the history and genealogy of Adelaide Churchill and the Buffinton house, Lizzie Borden’s next-door neighbor.

“The Edmund Lester Pearson/Frank Knowlton Correspondence.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.1 (Jan. 1998): 12-17.
Part II of the reprint of the correspondence between Pearson and Frank Knowlton (Letters 8-26) regarding the Lizzie Borden case. Printed courtesy of the Fall River Historical Society.

Lewis, Rob. “Fall River.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.1 (Jan. 1998): 17.
Brief description of a new book by Lewis on the history of Fall River that includes material relating to Lizzie Borden.

McGinn, Martha. “Looking Back: My Life at 92 Second Street, 1960 Till Now.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.1 (Jan. 1998): 6-7.
Martha McGinn, the current owner of 92 Second Street and the owner of the Lizzie Borden Bed & Breakfast, relates her memories of living in the house since the age of seventeen when she moved in with her grandparents, the owners at the time.

Quigley, George E. “Background of the House on Second Street.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.1 (Jan. 1998): 8-9.
Quigley accounts for the ownership of 92 Second Street, from its building by Southard Miller, to the sale of the house twenty-five years after Lizzie’s trial, to the current owners. Reprint of the Fall River Evening News of 1 March 1912 (obituary of John Morse), the first-ever printing of a photograph of Morse provided by the Fall River Historical Society, and an interview with Mrs. Doris Reed Grimwade, who as a young girl had met Morse.

Rimer, Jane. “The House: Through My Eyes.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.1 (Jan. 1998): 7-8.
Rimer relates her first-hand experience of touring the Second Street house.

Ryckebusch, Jules and Maynard F. Bertolet. “Lizzie, Yes; Lizzie, No.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.1 (Jan. 1998): 11.
Ryckebusch and Bertolet offer their opinions as to the authenticity of photograph, allegedly of Lizzie Borden amidst a group of young women, taken by Gay’s Studio in Fall River, circa 1890.

Ryckebusch, Jules. “The Second Borden Trial.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.1 (Jan. 1998): 1, 18-19.
Ryckebusch reports on his participation as a jury member in the retrial of Lizzie Borden conducted by Stanford Law School, presided over by the Chief Justice and an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.1 (Jan. 1998): 4.
Reviews of Murder in America, A History by Roger Lane, “Lizzie’s Tiger” and “The Fall River Axe Murders” in Burning Your Boats: The Collected Short Stories by Angela Carter, and the Chad Mitchell Trio singing “Lizzie Borden” on several of their recordings (Mighty Day on Campus and The Best of the Chad Mitchell Trio).

Vol. V, No. 2, April 1998

Adilz, Fritz. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.2 (April 1998): 3.
Letter in which Mr. Adilz votes that the photograph previously printed in the LBQ (January 1998) by Gay’s Studio purporting to be a picture of Lizzie Borden and her friends is not her.

Allen, Glenn. “Lizzie Borden and O.J. Simpson.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.2 (April 1998): 8-10.
Two-page comparison chart that breaks both cases into three areas of study: the crime, the accused, and the trial.

“The Ballad of O.J. Simpson.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.2 (April 1998): 10.
Six-stanza poem supposed to be sung to the tune “The Ballad of Lizzie Borden.”

Bertolet, Maynard. “Lizzie, Yes – Lizzie, No.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.2 (April 1998): 3, 13.
In response to the January 1998 printing of a photograph by Gay’s Studio that purports to be Lizzie and her friends, Mr. Bertolet updates the disposition of the picture and includes responses by readers of the LBQ as to whether they believe the image to be Lizzie Borden. The photograph in question accompanies the text.

Bertolet, Maynard. “A Tale of Two Pictures.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.2 (April 1998): 13.
Brief article that compares two views of the guest bedroom taken from the doorway (one from 1892 and one contemporary) to show “how difficult it might be for any person walking down the stairs, looking ahead, and focusing on the events below, to discern a body on the other side of the bed.”

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.2 (April 1998): 5, 14.
Caplain compares the murder of Andrew and Abby Borden with a murder that occurred sixty years before in Fall River-Sara Maria Cornell, who was found dead by hanging from a hay rack on the farm of Richard Borden. There is also a brief note that Lizzie is mentioned in the American Heritage Dictionary and the Random House Dictionary.

“The Edmund Lester Pearson/Frank Knowlton Correspondence.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.2 (April 1998): 7, 17-19.
Part III of the reprint of the correspondence between Pearson and Frank Knowlton (Letters 26-34) regarding the Lizzie Borden case. Printed courtesy of the Fall River Historical Society.

Golden, Eve. “Her Double Life.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.2 (April 1998): 6.
Reprint of pages 45-47 of Golden’s book on Theda Bara entitled Vamp, The Rise and Fall of Theda Bara, notable for its inclusion of a short section on the actress Nance O’Neil.

“Known Films of Nance O’Neil.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.2 (April 1998): 11.
Chart listing all the known films that Nance O’Neil appeared in following her retirement from the stage.

McNelly, Nancy A.F. “The Online Lizzie Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.2 (April 1998): 1, 15-17.
McNelly details the development and design of her web page (The Virtual Lizzie Borden House). Included are several images from her site and diagrams showing the stages of the building of the site.

Noe, Denise. “Borden and Ramsey Murder Cases.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.2 (April 1998): 11.
Noe notes the remarkable similarities between the Lizzie Borden murder case and the JonBenet Ramsey slaying.

“O.J. According to Dr. Seuss.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.2 (April 1998): 10.
Poem ala “Green Eggs and Ham” on the O.J. Simpson murder case.

Savery, Florence J. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.2 (April 1998): 3.
Savery agrees with Mr. Maynard Bertolet that the photograph by Gay’s Studio purporting to be Lizzie Borden does not resemble her.

Troost, Kathleen. “The Sound of Abby.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.2 (April 1998): 12.
Troost invites readers to “turn on the imagination” and try to visualize and hear the felling of Abby that morning on 4 August 1892, to help determine whether she faced her assailant or if she made a noise when she hit the ground.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.2 (April 1998): 4.
Reviews of The Borden Tragedy by Rick Geary, “The Myth of Lizzie Borden” in The Quality of Murder by James Reach, and “The Lizzie Borden Case” from The New York Times Magazine by Meyer Berger.

Vol. V, No. 3, July 1998

Bertolet, Maynard. “The Robinson Files.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.3 (July 1998): 7-9.
Includes a letter from Jules Ryckebusch to the New Bedford Standard Times offering his opinion that the release of the files are “very, very remote,” a reprint of an Associated Press wire report on the issue, a letter to the editor of the LBQ by a Jamie Shondell appealing to the Massachusetts Board of Overseers to release the documents because of their historical value, and, finally, Mr. Bertolet’s reply to Ms. Shondell that states that even if they were released, he doubts that the files would contain “any revelations or secret information.”

“The Broken Branch.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.3 (July 1998): 19.
Page devoted to the passing of Ronald E. Evans, the co-owner of the Lizzie Borden Bed & Breakfast. Includes two photographs of Mr. Evans.

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.3 (July 1998): 5.
Caplain retraces the steps of Andrew Borden on the morning of 4 August 1892.

“Lizzie’s Stepping Stone.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.3 (July 1998): 9.
Photograph of the stone that Lizzie Borden supposedly used to step from her carriage, and currently owned by Robert Dube, the owner of Maplecroft.

“Maplecroft in the News.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.3 (July 1998): 9.
Interview with Mr. Robert J. Dube, current owner of Maplecroft. He has asked the Fall River Zoning Board for a variance to open the house into a bed and breakfast.

Masterton, William L. “Washing the Handleless Hatchet.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.3 (July 1998): 3.
Masterton disputes oft-repeated claims that when Professor Wood was testifying at the trial in regards to the murder weapon and whether blood could have been washed from its surface so it could not be detected, he was not, in fact, speaking of the famous handleless hatchet, but was testifying about a claw-hammer hatchet which had been eliminated as a murder weapon.

McNelly, Nancy A. F. “The Online Lizzie Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.3 (July 1998): 6, 10-11, 18.
Extensive examination of various online sources related to Lizzie Borden studies.

Parker, Paul Edward. “Letting Lizzie Borden Speak From the Grave.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.3 (July 1998): 7.
Reprint of the Journal-Bulletin news article about the pending court ruling on the Robinson papers and their possible release to the public. The law firm that maintains possession of the former Governor Robinson’s files on the Lizzie Borden case is seeking to keep the files confidential, citing attorney-client privilege.

Schley-Ulrich, William. “Ex Libris Lizzie Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.3 (July 1998): 1, 12-18.
Lengthy article that details part of Lizzie’s library and investigates the influence their contents “may have exerted upon the refinement of her innate faculties.”

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.3 (July 1998): 4.
Reviews of “The Witness Statements” published by the Lizzie Borden B&B, “Lizzie Borden” in Mysterious Persons in History: Baffling Cases of Unsolved Mysteries by Fred Neff, “Lizzie Borden” in Twenty Names in Crime by Andrew Langley, and The Very Scary Almanac by Eric Elfman.

Vol. V, No. 4, October 1998

Bertolet, Maynard. “Lizzie Borden: A New Musical.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.4 (October 1998): 18-19.
Full-page article detailing the new production of a musical titled Lizzie Borden by Christopher McGovern and Amy Powers. The show will premiere on October 28, 1998 and is being produced by the American Stage Company in Teaneck, NJ. A profile of Alison Fraser, who plays Lizzie, is also included. Two photographs accompany the text, and a full-page advertisement for the show appears on page 19.

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.4 (October 1998): 1, 5, 17.
Caplain looks back at the day of 4 August 1892 and shares with us the residents and businesses on the west side of Second Street. A map of Second Street in Fall River in 1892 accompanies the text.

“The Edmund Lester Pearson/Frank Knowlton Correspondence.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.4 (October 1998): 11-17.
Part IV of the reprint of correspondence between Pearson and Frank Knowlton (Letters #35-50) regarding the Lizzie Borden case. Printed courtesy of the Fall River Historical Society.

Flynn, Robert A. “Students, Statues and Things.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.4 (October 1998): 9.
Brief item about a young girl who called upon Mr. Flynn to “garner material for a presentation before her history class.” His assistance greatly added to your final project.

Leonard, Thomas C. “From the Whitehead Point of View.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.4 (October 1998): 8-9.
Reprint and transcription of a letter from Abby B. Potter to Victoria Lincoln in 1968. She relates what she remembers her mother (S. Bertha), sister of Abby Borden, telling her about the division of the property when the family homestead was divided upon the death of “Grandpa Gray” in 1878. Leonard’s accompanying article disputes many of the facts of the letter.

Mitchell, Walter J. “An Edmund Pearson/Frank Knowlton Prequel.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.4 (October 1998): 10.
Mitchell sets the stage for the relationship between Edmund Pearson and Frank Knowlton as a context to the Pearson/Knowlton letters published in installments in the LBQ.

“More About Porter’s Book.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.4 (October 1998): 3.
In response to William Schley-Ulrich’s article in the October 1997 issue of the LBQ where he traced all known copies of the original 1893 edition of Edwin Porter’s book The Fall River Tragedy, a Mr. Ross submitted a page from the Peter L. Stern and Company Antiquarian Bookseller rare books catalog that indicates yet another copy.

Noe, Denise. “Borden Family Values.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.4 (October 1998): 6.
Noe disputes those who would call Andrew stingy and points out several known instances of his generosity. In addition, she notes that the value that seems to have been at the top the Borden family’s list was loyalty.

Rimer, Jane. “The Happening.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.4 (October 1998): 7.
Rimer relates her experiences in staying the night at 92 Second Street at the newly-opened Lizzie Borden Bed & Breakfast.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly V.4 (October 1998): 4.
Reviews of Our Lady of Fall River by Stephen Ronan, “Abigail and Andrew Borden” in The Who’s Who of Unsolved Murders by James Morton, Mystery and Mayhem: Tales of Lust, Murder, Madness and Disappearance by Michelle Ghaffari, and “Many Take a Whack at Naming Tool” from the New Bedford Standard Times by Stephen Urbon.

Vol. VI, No. 1, January 1999

Adler, Gabriela Schalow. “The Legend of Lizzie Borden: But She Doesn’t Look Like a Fiend.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.1 (Jan. 1999): 1, 10-16.
Adler details the various and sundry ways in which Lizzie Borden has been portrayed, both on the television screen and in literature (fiction and non-fiction).

Bounds, Benny. “A Letter About Porter’s Book and the Robinson Papers.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.1 (Jan. 1999): 3.
Letter to the editor in which Bounds relates his discovery on the Internet of six copies of the original edition of Porter’s The Fall River Tragedy, ranging in price from $750 to $1500.

“The Broken Branch.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.1 (Jan. 1999): 23.
Page devoted to the passing of Margaret A. Ryckebusch, the wife of the publisher of the Quarterly. Includes a reprint of the 8-stanza poem “My Ain Countrie.”

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits: Subject and Author Index to the Lizzie Borden Quarterly.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.1 (Jan. 1999): 5, 17-22.
Separate subject and author indices of the Quarterly for volumes one, two, and three. Not annotated.

Chapman, Sherry and Marla. “Lizzie Borden Jokes.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.1 (Jan. 1999): 9.
Hilarious grouping of jokes relating to Lizzie Borden and the case.

“CNN Network News.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.1 (Jan. 1999): 7, 16.
Reprint of the CNN Network Internet report on the Robinson papers when their release was possibly immanent.

Hoffman, Paul Dennis. “Lizzie Borden’s Middle Name.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.1 (Jan. 1999): 8-9.
Hoffman poses two questions for our consideration: Why did Lizzie’s father and mother give her a man’s middle name, and “does it have anything to do with a possible solution to the crime?”

“Lizzie’s Handcuffs?” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.1 (Jan. 1999): 22.
Short article with accompanying photograph of what Fall River Deputy Chief Rick Thorpe believes to be the handcuffs that may have been used on Lizzie after her arrest.

“More About the Robinson Papers.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.1 (Jan. 1999): 6, 16.
Transcription of a letter written to Jules Ryckebusch from the firm of Robinson, Donovan, Madden and Barry detailing their refusal to release any information as to the contents of the Robinson files which are owned by their firm.

Viste, Kathryn Moore. “Be Careful What You Wish For.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.1 (Jan. 1999): 7.
Viste hypothesizes that by finding out the contents of the elusive Robinson files, Bordenites just might have a solution to the case. It is the not knowing that is, as she says, “half the fun.”

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.1 (Jan. 1999): 4.
Reviews of “Lizzie Borden’s Fate” (newspaper article dated 26 Jan. 1893, “Lizzie Borden” in The Encyclopedia of World Crime by Jay Robert Nash, and Gerald F. Uelman’s article “Lizzie Borden Meets O.J. Simpson” in Litigation (journal).

Vol. VI, No. 2, April 1999

Barton, Marjorie. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.2 (April 1999): 3.
Barton, a resident of the Irish Republic, writes a brief letter noting a discrepancy in the reporting of CNN in regards to the Robinson papers.

Bertolet, Maynard. “Miss Lizzie Borden’s Editor Speaks.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.2 (April 1999): 3.
In a column devoted to editor’s notes, Mr. Bertolet includes information provided by Patterson Smith and his studies in old handcuffs. Included is a schematic of a set of handcuffs described as being used during the time of the trial.

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits: Subject and Author Index to the Lizzie Borden Quarterly.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.2 (April 1999): 5, 16-20.
Separate subject and author indices of the Quarterly for volumes four and five. Not annotated.

Caplain, Neilson. “New York City Opera’s Lizzie Borden Production.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.2 (April 1999): 1, 21.
Lengthy article which details the premiere of the opera Lizzie Borden by Jack Beeson at the New York City Opera. Several photographs accompany the piece.

“The Edmund Lester Pearson/Frank Knowlton Correspondence.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.2 (April 1999): 11-15.
Part V of the reprint of correspondence between Pearson and Frank Knowlton (Letters #51-63) regarding the Lizzie Borden case. Printed courtesy of the Fall River Historical Society.

Lane, Roger. “Edmund Lester Pearson Revisited Again.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.2 (April 1999): 9-10, 22.
Introduction to a new edition of Pearson’s Studies in Murder that is being published by Ohio State University Press.

Masterton, William L. “The Robinson File; What’s In It?” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.2 (April 1999): 6, 22.
Masterton postulates about the contents of the Robinson files.

Noe, Denise. “Was Lizzie Borden a Shoplifter.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.2 (April 1999): 7.
Noe uses logic to dispute the gossip and rumor that Lizzie was a kleptomaniac and cites as proof of her innocence the “confession” supposedly signed by Lizzie that was later attested to be a forgery.

“Panoramic View of the Borden Plot.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.2 (April 1999): 20.
Photograph taken by Jeannine Bertolet of the Borden plot at the Oak Grove Cemetery in Fall River.

Rimer, Jane. “Capturing the Soul of Lizzie Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.2 (April 1999): 8.
Rimer relates her impressions of The Legend of Lizzie Borden and finds the music by Billy Goldenberg to “add yet another dimension to the story.”

Smith, Patterson. “Handcuffs in Lizzie’s Time.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.2 (April 1999): 8.
Brief article that details the four different kinds of common handcuffs in use during the time of Lizzie Borden’s trial.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.2 (April 1999): 4.
Review of “Murder in Hatred: The Commonwealth of Massachusetts Versus Lizzie Borden” in First Degree by William Kunstler, “Lizzie Andrew Borden” in American Women’s History: An A to Z of People, Organizations, Issues, and Events by Doris Weatherford, “Representing Miss Lizzie: Cultural Convictions in the Trial of Lizzie Borden” in the Yale Journal of Law and the Humanities by Cara Robertson, and “Commemoration of the Lizzie Lore Must Be Done With Taste” in The Fall River Herald News by Bernard F. Sullivan.

Vol. VI, No. 3, July 1999

“An Anonymous Letter.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.3 (July 1999): 3.
Letter to the Editor from Maui, Hawaii, in which the writer points out that Lizzie Borden’s middle name could indeed by “Andrews” as carved on the Borden tombstone, instead of the long-believed “Andrew.”

Bertolet, Maynard. “Case Reopened.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.3 (July 1999): 7.
Bertolet details The Learning Channel’s documentary “Case Reopened,” hosted by Ed McBain.

Bertolet, Maynard F. and Dennis A. Binette. “History’s Mysteries.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.3 (July 1999): 1, 21.
Article detailing the premiere of The Strange Case of Lizzie Borden on 2 August 1999 on the History Channel.

Binette, Dennis A. “New Borden-Related Document Added to Collection.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.3 (July 1999): 8.
Binette details the finding and contents of a new piece of Borden-related ephemera, a hand-written manuscript from John J. Manning, reporter for the Fall River Daily Herald, to his boss, city editor Clarence E. Bury, that relates the moment of the verdict of “Not Guilty” at Lizzie Borden’s murder trial.

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.3 (July 1999): 5, 21-22.
Caplain explores the Bordens and their connection to the city of Fall River, investigates the details of the life of Mayor John W. Coughlin, Southard Miller, John Vinnicum Morse, and interesting and troublesome finds on the Internet. Included is a history of the John W. Coughlin School in Fall River.

Curry, Judith Paula. “Visiting Lizzie at 92 Second Street.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.3 (July 1999): 6.
Curry relates her visit to 92 Second Street and her meeting with Arnold Brown and Florence Bingham.

“The Edmund Lester Pearson/Frank Knowlton Correspondence.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.3 (July 1999): 9-20.
Part VI of the reprint of correspondence between Pearson and Frank Knowlton (Letters #64-88) regarding the Lizzie Borden case. Printed courtesy of the Fall River Historical Society.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.3 (July 1999): 4.
Reviews of “Lizzie Borden Took an Axe” in the New York Times Magazine by Mary Cantwell, “The Fall River Murders” in Crime Mysteries by Barbara Johnston Adams, Dead and Buried in New England by Mary Maynard, “The Day I Ripped Off Lizzie’s House” in Murder Ink: The Mystery Reader’s Companion by Ellen Stern, Flappers, Bootleggers, ‘Typhoid Mary’ & the Bomb by Barrington Boardman, and “1892: Lizzie Borden Axe Murders” in The Pessimist’s Guide to History by Stuart Flexner.

Vol. VI, No. 4, October 1999

Bertolet, Maynard. “Lizzie Didn’t Do It.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.4 (October 1999): 3.
Brief note announcing that King Philip Publishing Company (owned by Robert Flynn) has negotiated the publishing of William L. Masterton’s book Lizzie Didn’t Do It by Branden Publishing Company of Boston, slated for print in Jan. 2000.

Bertolet, Maynard. “That Illusive Trial Transcript.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.4 (October 1999): 7, 23.
Bertolet examines the reason why the trial transcript of the Lizzie Borden trial is so difficult to obtain.

Brown, Michael. “You Can’t Chop Your Poppa Up in Massachusetts.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.4 (October 1999): 9.
Reprint of the three verses of the Brown song, written for the Broadway show New Faces of 1952.

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizzie’s Obituary.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.4 (October 1999): 5, 23.
A verbatim report that appeared in the Boston Herald, Friday, 3 June 1927, the day after Lizzie died.

Caplain, Neilson. “Richard Plant.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.3 (July 1999): 8.
Caplain relates the details of an obituary of one Richard Plant, notable for the inclusion of Lizzie Borden and the murders as a hobby of the late Mr. Plant.

“The Edmund Lester Pearson/Frank Knowlton Correspondence.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.4 (October 1999): 10-17.
Conclusion of the reprint of correspondence between Pearson and Frank Knowlton (Letters #89-106) regarding the Lizzie Borden case. Printed courtesy of the Fall River Historical Society. Also included is a photograph of Pearson.

Noe, Denise. “The Murderer Who Inadvertently Helped Miss Lizzie.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.4 (October 1999): 8.
Noe examines the Bertha Manchester murder case, an axe murder that occurred in Fall River ten months after the Borden slayings.

“The Old Court House and Police Station.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.4 (October 1999): 23.
Photograph of the old courthouse and police station in Fall River, courtesy of the Fall River Historical Society.

Roach, Marilynne K. “Choosing the Borden Trial Jury.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.4 (October 1999): 1, 18-22.
Roach details the Borden Trial Jury and the manner in which they were chosen to sit on what would be called the trial of the century. Included is a lengthy chart of all prospective jurors examined for the trial, with reference pages to the trial transcript, and a listing of the members of the jury pool not questioned and their cities of residence.

Roach, Marilynne K. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.4 (October 1999): 3.
Roach answers a question raised by a previous letter to editor relating to the reason why Oliver E. Gifford was dropped from the trial jury. She additionally comments that the trial should be published.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.4 (October 1999): 4.
Reviews of “Lizzie Andrew Borden” in American National Biography by Olive Hoogenboon, “Lizzie Borden: And When She Saw What She Had Done” in The Good, The Bad & The Mad: Weird People in American History by E. Randall Floyd, and “The Deftness of Her Sex: Innocence, Guilt, and Gender” from Lethal Imagination: Violence and Brutality in American History by Catherine Ross Nickerson.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “Lizzie Borden Past & Present.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VI.4 (October 1999): 6, 17.
Lengthy review of Leonard Rebello’s book Lizzie Borden Past & Present, including a reprint of the cover art.

Vol. VII, No. 1, January 2000

“An Anonymous Letter.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.1 (January 2000): 3.
Letter that reveals that only sixteen months before the Borden murders, Abby’s mother’s remains were exhumed and reburied (at some expense) in the Oak Grove Cemetery. The writer finds it “intriguing to speculate on the Borden family discussions that much have taken place regarding the cost of transfer and location of the reburial site of Sarah Gray.”

Brody, Howard. “Raves for Rebello!” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.1 (January 2000): 7.
Letter that praises Leonard Rebello’s book Lizzie Borden: Past and Present and notes one error in the text.

“The Broken Branch.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.1 (January 2000): 23.
Page devoted to the passing of Arnold R. Brown, the author of the controversial book Lizzie Borden: The Legend, the Truth, the Final Chapter, on 1 May 1999. Accompanying the notice of his death is a reprint of the entire poem “My Ain Countrie.”

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.1 (January 2000): 5.
Caplain traces the production history of The Fall River Legend. Three photographs, one of Agnes de Mille, accompany the text.

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizzie Borden Quarterly Indices: Volume VI, 1999.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.1 (January 2000): 9-13.
Subject and Author index to the LBQ for the year 1999.

“Lizzie Didn’t Do It.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.1 (January 2000): 3.
Short article announcing that the final corrections had been made to William L. Masterton’s book Lizzie Didn’t Do It and the book should be available for purchase in February of 2000.

Musselman, Faye. “Raves for Rebello!” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.1 (January 2000): 6.
Highly favorable review of Leonard Rebello’s book Lizzie Borden: Past and Present.

“My Ain Countrie.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.1 (January 2000): 23.
Text of the entire poem that was thought to be a favorite of Lizzie’s, “My Ain Countrie.”

Pederson, Carol. “Lizzie in the Classroom.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.1 (January 2000): 1, 14-22.
Pederson’s essay, a class assignment for her U.S. Criminal Trials class, thoroughly researches the Lizzie Borden case. A new photograph of Lizzie (c. 1880), previously unpublished and courtesy of the Fall River Historical Society, accompanies the text.

Ranalli, Ralph. “Case (Still) Closed.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.1 (January 2000): 8, 22.
Reprint of a Boston Globe article that appeared on 17 October 1999, with the title “Jeff McCormick is One of the Few Living People to Have Read the Lizzie Borden Defense Files, But He Can Never Share What He Knows About One of New England’s Most Infamous Cases.”

Schley-Ulrich, William. “Raves for Rebello!” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.1 (January 2000): 7.
Letter that praises Leonard Rebello’s book Lizzie Borden: Past and Present but wishes he could expand the index.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.1 (January 2000): 4.
Reviews of “Why Did Lizzie Borden Really Do It?” in True New England Mysteries, Ghosts, Crimes & Oddities by Charles Turek Robinson, “100 Years of Fact, Conjecture and Fascination” from AB Bookmans Weekly by Robert A. Flynn, “Hooked on Axe Murder” from New England Monthly by Norris Randolph, and “Crime at 32” in The Book of Ages by Desmond Morris.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “Lizzie Borden: The Hands of Time.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.1 (January 2000): 7.
Favorable review of Muriel Arnold’s Lizzie Borden: The Hands of Time that Zawadzki finds “refreshing” and a book that will “inspire some interesting debate among Borden readers” in its assertion of Bridget’s guilt.

Vol. VII, No. 2, April 2000

“Book Notes.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.2 (April 2000): 3.
Brief reports about the soon-to-be published books Lizzie Didn’t Do It by William Masterton and Yesterday in Old Fall River by Paul Dennis Hoffman.

“The Broken Branch.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.2 (April 2000): 22-23.
Two-pages devoted to the passing of Florence Cook Brigham, former curator of the Fall River Historical Society. One entire page consists of four photographs of Mrs. Brigham, from her youth to later years.

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.2 (April 2000): 5, 20-21.
Profile of the author of the Lizbits column in the LBQ.

Fleming, Jack Wayne. “I Delivered Miss Borden’s Saturday Evening Post.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.2 (April 2000): 6, 21.
Interview with Charles Warner who, as a 12-year-old boy, delivered the Saturday Evening Post every week to Lizzie Borden when she resided at Maplecroft. His reminiscences of her make this a gem of an article. Two photographs of Charles accompany the text, one as a young boy, the other contemporary.

McAleer, Andrew. “You’re Home, Lizzie Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.2 (April 2000): 3.
Reprint of five-stanza poem of Lizzie’s life after the acquittal.

“The Opening Commonwealth Argument by William H. Moody.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.2 (April 2000): 8-17.
Transcription of the opening statement for the Commonwealth (William H. Moody) in the Trial of Lizzie Andrew Borden. Also included is a photo of Moody and a short biographical sketch of the attorney, and photographs of the handleless hatchet, Adelaide Churchill, and a cartoon of Alice Russell from the Providence Daily Journal.

Rebello, Leonard. “Print in the Bordens’ Sitting Room Identified.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.2 (April 2000): 1, 18-21.
Rebello’s article reports on the research and discovery of the title of the painting and the artist of the work that hung above the couch in the Borden’s sitting room, directly above Andrew’s lifeless body in the crime scene photograph. (it is titled “The Village Elms – Sunday Morning in New England” by American artist Albert Fitch Bellows.)

Rimer, Jane. “Maplecroft: The Magic of History.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.2 (April 2000): 7.
Rimer details her experiences in spending the night at Maplecroft. Included are three photographs of the house, all courtesy of the Fall River Historical Society.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.2 (April 2000): 4, 17.
Reviews of “Lizzie Borden: Alleged Parricide” in Encyclopedia of American Scandal by George C. Kohn, “A Famous Chopper” in Murder in North America by Lionel A. Martinez, “Lizzie Borden Memories Abound at the Anchor” from The Anchor by Pat McGowan, and “Lizzie Borden Killed Her Parents With an Axe” in Everything You Know is Wrong by Paul Kirchner.

Vol. VII, No. 3, July 2000

Adilz, Fritz. “Why Did He Go There?” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.3 (July 2000): 8-9, 22.
Adilz investigates the facts surrounding a newspaper report that quoted Mrs. Emery as saying that “Dr. Bowen came in just as Mr. Morse left” and tries to determine why Bowen would have paid a visit to Mrs. Emery during the very time he was to be sending a telegram to Emma in Fairhaven. Photographs of Dr. Seabury Bowen and John Morse accompany the text.

“Book Notes.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.3 (July 2000): 3.
Note that the Paul Dennis Hoffman book Yesterday in Old Fall River will be published by September 2000.

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.3 (July 2000): 5, 16-18.
Article covers several topics in this column, including the sights and sounds of Fall River past and present, the incorrect Lizzie Borden question on Jeopardy, Inspector Medley’s later fame, speculations on the reasons why Lizzie remained unmarried, a biographical sketch on David Kent (author of Forty Whacks), and a description of Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Weekly of 29 June 1893 and its cover sketch of Lawyer Robinson addressing the Court before the acquittal.

McAleer, Andrew. “The Grand Jury of Lizzie Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.3 (July 2000): 23.
Brief examination of the grand jury process in Massachusetts in 1892 and details regarding the leaking of the grand jury’s indictment against Lizzie Borden.

Noe, Denise. “Discretion.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.3 (July 2000): 23.
Eight-word poem about Lizzie’s friends.

“The Opening Defense Argument by Andrew Jennings.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.3 (July 2000): 10-16.
Transcription of the opening defense argument in the trial of Lizzie Borden. Photographs that accompany the text include Andrew Borden, Andrew Jennings (plus a short biographical note about Jennings), and Abby Borden.

Rebello, Leonard. “Borden & Almy, Company – Services Rendered.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.3 (July 2000): 7, 22.
Reprint of an itemized bill for undertaking services paid to Borden & Almy Co., from the estate of Charles L. Cummings, a horse dealer. It offers great insight into the Andrew’s business practices and charges for his services. Included is the process and chemicals involved in embalming bodies at the turn of the century.

Roach, Marilynne K. “Poisonous Thoughts.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.3 (July 2000): 1, 19-21.
Analysis of the testimony, evidence, and reports of Lizzie’s attempted purchase of prussic acid the day before the murders. Concludes Roach, the “witnesses’ contradictory recollections, anti-drugstore campaigns, and Lizzie Borden look-alikes offer probable doubt to armchair detectives and leaves the ironic possibility that Lizzie Borden’s poison alibi was Abby Borden herself.”

Schneider, Ada Jill. “Centenary: August 4, 1892 – 1992.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.3 (July 2000): 18.
Poem about the Lizzie Borden Conference at Bristol Community College.
Schneider, Marvin. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.4 (October 2000): 3.
Schneider writes to point out three errors that occurred in the LBQ in the previous issue.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.3 (July 2000): 4.
Reviews of “Lizzie Stumps Smart Alex” from the Providence Journal by Paul Edward Parker, Proceedings: Lizzie Borden Conference edited by Jules R. Ryckebusch, and The Paper: The Life and Death of the New York Herald Tribune by Richard Kluger.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “Lizzie Didn’t Do It!” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.3 (July 2000): 6.
Very favorable review of William L. Masterton’s book Lizzie Didn’t’ Do It!. Concludes Zawadzki, “the theories and information about the timing of Abby’s death has but a fresh new angle on what could have happened that day at 92 Second Street. While I don’t think anyone will ever get the final word on who did ‘do it,’ this is a book that Borden readers should buy without hesitation.” Included is information on how the reader can purchase autographed copies of the book.

Vol. VII, No. 4, October 2000

“Another, Another Borden Trial.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.4 (October 2000): 22.
News item reporting that three justices on the Massachusetts Superior Court will preside at a retrial of Lizzie Borden in Boston in January 2001.

“Book Notes.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.4 (October 2000): 3.
Note that the Paul Dennis Hoffman book Yesterday in Old Fall River will be available in November 2000.

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.4 (October 2000): 5, 19.
Caplain covers several topics in this column, including tourism and the Lizzie Borden attraction, a brief note about Evan Hunter (Ed McBain) the author of Lizzie, the ubiquitous quality of Lizzie Borden, and notes from the Fall River Herald of 3 August 1893.

Demakis, Denise. “The Rocky Point Picnic.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.4 (October 2000): 6, 21.
Demakis provides details of the Rocky Point Picnic that was in progress on the morning of the murders on 4 August 1892. Two photographs, one of the Rocky Point Pier and Ferry (c. 1910) and the Rocky Point Gazebo (c. 1910), accompany the text.

Hoffman, Paul Dennis. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.4 (October 2000): 22.
Letter congratulating the LBQ for its new color layout, noting Morse’s incorrect age in a previous issue, and the news that his book Yesterday in Old Fall River will shortly be published.

Hoffman, Paul Dennis. “Remembering Mrs. Florence Cook Brigham.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.4 (October 2000): 7.
Hoffman shares his memories of meeting Mrs. Brigham in 1989.

“Internet Announcement.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.4 (October 2000): 22.
Note that Eric Stedman’s website is partially devoted to Lizzie Borden, including a chat room that is open on Thursday nights at 9 PM. The address of the website is included in the note.

Leonard, Thomas C. “Parricide on the QT: Notoriety and Knowingness at the Dawn of New Media.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.4 (October 2000): 8-12.
Leonard examines the songs and gossip of the Victorian world to illuminate the first principles of media history. Concludes Leonard, “At the beginning of this century, the public was armed with the powerful tool of knowingness that was part of their popular culture. The cues and scripts for these attitudes crossed national as well as class boundaries. People leading ordinary lives needed no machine, no invention, to use this habit of mind to overturn what authorities said. These citizens lived in a wired world, but not one dependent on the connections made by electricity.”

Noe, Denise. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.4 (October 2000): 22.
Brief note stating that the title of her poem in the table of contents printed in the past issue of the LBQ is listed as “Deception” instead of the correct title “Discretion.”

Noe, Denise. “The Man Who Came to Dinner.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.4 (October 2000): 7.
Brief article that reports that the 1942 movie titled The Man Who Came to Dinner features a character inspired by Lizzie Borden.

Rebello, Leonard. “Unveiled: Miss Helen Leighton.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.4 (October 2000): 1, 20.
Biographical essay on the life and times of Helen Leighton, Lizzie Borden’s close friend and beneficiary of her estate in 1927. A photograph of Helen Leighton (premiere printing) accompanies the text.

“The Testimony of Miss Bridget Sullivan.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.4 (October 2000): 13-19.
First installment of Bridget’s trial testimony. Photographs of Bridget (c. 1892) and William Henry Moody (plus a brief biographical note on Moody) accompany the text.

“Yesterday in Old Fall River: A Lizzie Borden Companion.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.4 (October 2000): 23.
Full-page advertisement for Paul Dennis Hoffman’s book, Yesterday in Old Fall River, and information on how and where to purchase a copy.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.4 (October 2000): 4.
Instead of her usual review-oriented column, Zawadzki examines “the major suspects put for by authors through the years.” Included are works by Edwin Porter (The Fall River Tragedy), Todd Lunday (The Mystery Unveiled), Victoria Lincoln (A Private Disgrace), Robert Sullivan (Goodbye Lizzie Borden), Edward Radin (Lizzie Borden: The Untold Story), Muriel Arnold (The Hands of Time), Gerald Gross (Masterpieces of Murder), Mary D. Smith (“Lament of a Legend” in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine), Frank Spiering (Lizzie), Q. Patrick (The Pocket Book of True Crime Stories), Arnold Brown (Lizzie Borden: The Legend, The Truth, The Final Chapter), Richard Powers (“The Death of a Massachusetts Trojan” from The Chief of Police magazine), Bernard Sullivan (“My Affair With Lizzie Borden” from Providence Sunday Journal and “Main Woman Says Lizzie Borden Told Her the Real Killer” from the Providence Journal-Bulletin), William Masterton (Lizzie Didn’t Do It!), and Lillian de la Torre (“The Small Shadow” from Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine).

Vol. VIII, No. 1, January 2001

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizzie Borden Murder Case Chronology ú Part I.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.1 (Jan. 2001): 5-10.
A revised version of the Caplain’s chronology that was printed in the April and July 1997 Lizzie Borden Quarterly.

Masterton, William. “Improper Conduct by Judge Blaisdell? Jennings vs. Blaisdell.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VII.1 (Jan. 2001): 1, 22-23.
Masterton accuses Judge Blaisdell of being “legally within his rights” to refuse to recuse himself from presiding over the Preliminary Hearing after presiding over the Inquest, but that he was “ethically guilty of what was at best a conflict of interest and at worst bribery.” Of note is Masterton’s detailing of the consequences of Blaisdell’s behavior in this and other cases, finding that the executive council was on the verge of submitting their recommendation to the Fall River Bar Association on Blaisdell when he unexpectedly resigned citing failing health, effectively ending the investigation into his actions. Included also is the resignation correspondence between Blaisdell and the executive council as well as excerpts from the Fall River Herald (March 16-April 13, 1893) regarding the topic.

Steele, Rebecca. “Beyond a Shadow of a Doubt: Searching for Truth in the Lizzie Borden Case.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.1 (Jan. 2001): 3, 20-22.
In a paper that was written as final assignment for a class in Critical Writing at Roger Williams University, Steele discusses three areas of the case: the impact of gender stereotypes on all involved with the case, the role that journalists played in strengthening that stereotype, and the dismissal of certain evidence in the case.

“The Testimony of Miss Bridget Sullivan.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.1 (January 2001): 11-20.
The second installment of Bridget’s trial testimony.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.1 (Jan. 2001): 4.
Reviews of “What Made Lizzie Kill?” by Marcia R. Carlson from American Heritage, “Everyone Questions Everything, Including Things That Shouldn’t Be” by Florence Brigham, “Lizzie Borden” in The Cases that Haunt Us by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker, and I Love Paul Revere, Whether He Rode or Not by Richard Shenkman.

Vol. VIII, No. 2, April 2001

Bixby, A.L. “To Lizzie.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.2 (April 2001): 19.
Short poem about Lizzie’s presumed guilt in the murders of her father and step-mother.

Brody, Howard. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.2 (April 2001): 3.
Brody writes to note that in a previous issue of the LBQ, Rebecca Steele stated that Dr. Wood was negligent in not testing the stomachs of Andrew and Abby for any poison other than prussic acid, when in fact, according to trial testimony, he did test the stomach contents for all commonly used poisons.

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.2 (April 2001): 5.
Column that covers several topics including a blurb about a Felix Borden in the Fall River Daily Globe, a praise-piece about Hosea Knowlton in the same issue of the FRDG, the FRDGs coverage of the closing arguments in the trial of Lizzie Borden, his imaginings about whether Lizzie Borden wore a corset, and a note about a new book by Evan Hunter/Ed McBain.

Rebello, Leonard. “John Morse’s Recollection of the Nathan Murder.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.2 (April 2001): 1, 20-22.
Rebello investigates the details of a comment that John Morse made to Assistant Marshal John Fleet regarding his memory of the Nathan murder that occurred twenty-two years previously.

Ryckebusch, Jules R. “The Publisher’s Page.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.2 (April 2001): 6.
Essay announcing the retirement of Jules Ryckebusch as publisher of the LBQ and introducing his successor, Gabriela Adler.

Steele, Rebecca. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.2 (April 2001): 3.
In response to a comment by Howard Brody that she had incorrectly criticized Dr. Wood for not examining the stomach contents for commonly used poisons when in fact he testified at the trial that he did just that, Steele defends her error by noting her time constraints and lack of access to any other source material other than Lizzie’s inquest testimony on the Fall River Police Department’s website.

“The Testimony of Miss Bridget Sullivan.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.2 (April 2001): 7-18, 22-23.
Part three of a four-part installment of a transcript of Bridget’s trial testimony. Included is a photograph of Governor George Robinson.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.2 (April 2001): 4.
Reviews of Lizzie Borden ‘Axe Murder’ Trial: A Headline Court Case by Joan Axelrod-Contrada, “Double Axe Murder in Fall River, 1892” in True Crime Diary: Vol. 2 by James Bland, and “Gendered Justice: Lizzie Borden and Victorian America” in Murder, Culture and Injustice: Four Sensational Cases in American History by Walter L. Hixson.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “Yesterday in Old Fall River.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.2 (April 2001): 19.
Very favorable review of Yesterday in Old Fall River by Paul Dennis Hoffman, which Zawadzki praises as “both a fun and informative book.” The website of the publisher is included for interested readers.

Vol. VIII, No. 3, July 2001

Adler, Gabriela Schalow. “Publisher’s Page. ” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.3 (July 2001): 21, 23.
Letter of arrival of the new publisher of the Lizzie Borden Quarterly. Includes photograph of Dr. Adler.

Berka, Landislav H. “Ladislav H. Berka Interviews William L. Masterton.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.3 (July 2001): 6, 15-16.
Interview with the author of Lizzie Didn’t Do It!, William L. Masterton.

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizzie Borden Murder Case Chronology—Conclusion.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.3 (July 2001): 5, 11-14.
The final installment of the revised version of the Caplain’s chronology that was printed in the April and July 1997 Lizzie Borden Quarterly.

Duniho, Terence. “Friends From Boyhood: A Police Officer and an Embezzler.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.3 (July 2001): 7, 17-20.
Duniho follows the trail of Joseph W. Carpenter, Jr., an employee of Andrew J. Borden who had embezzled $6,700 from Borden & Almy as a possible suspect in the murder of Andrew and Abby Borden.

Hoffman, Paul Dennis. “The Crucial 20 Minutes: A Revised Lizzie Borden Time Line.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.3 (July 2001): 22-23.
Hoffman asserts that Lizzie had more than enough time to kill her father and clean herself up afterwards based on his new reading of the testimony and time lines of the case.

Rebello, Leonard. “Emma in Fairhaven.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.3 (July 2001): 1, 10.
Rebello investigates Emma’s trip to Fairhaven in the week before the murders and offers details of her trip and the family she visited there. Included is a detailed map of the area around Green St. in Fairhaven, c. 1895.

Rimer, Jane. “Lizzie Borden: A New Musical.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.3 (July 2001): 3.
Brief item announcing the production of Lizzie Borden by Amy Powers and Christopher McGovern is soon to be performed at the Norma Tennis Theatre in Chester, Connecticut.

Schneider, Marvin. “Letter to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.3 (July 2001): 3.
Schneider suggests that those interested in the Nathan murder might be intrigued by New York Police Inspector Thomas Byrnes’ “1886 Professional Criminals in America.”

“The Testimony of Miss Bridget Sullivan.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.3 (July 2001): 8-10..
Conclusion of a four-part installment of a transcript of Bridget’s trial testimony. Included is a photograph of Chief Justice Albert C. Mason.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.3 (July 2001): 4, 16.
Reviews of “When She Saw What She Had Done” in With an Axe by Paul H. Jeffers, “Taking an Axe to History: The Historical Lizzie Borden and the Postmodern Historiography of Angela Carter” from Clio by Christine Berni, and “The Case of Lizzie Borden (1893)” in The Press on Trial: Crimes and Trials as Media Events by Donald R. Avery.

Vol. VIII, No. 4, October 2001

Bertolet, Maynard. “The Lizzie Borden and Bridget Sulivan Missing Inquest Transcripts.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.4 (October 2001): 7, 15-19.
Bertolet details his quest for the whereabouts of Volume I of the Inquest, which has been lost to us since 1892. Important facts regarding the probable chain of ownership, from Annie White’s stenographic notes (and how exactly she transcribed the testimony) to its eventual disappearance are examined.

Bertolet, Maynard. “The Lizzie Borden Quarterly Welcomes LizzieAndrewBorden.com.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.4 (October 2001): 6.
Bertolet praises the newest website devoted to Borden studies as “so doggoned good it would be disgraceful not to report it to you.” Screenshots from the site accompany the text.

Bertolet, Maynard. “Preliminary Trial Witness Sequence.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.4 (October 2001): 19-22.
Important article that answers the complicated question as to who testified at the Preliminary Hearing in the Lizzie Borden case and when.

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.4 (October 2001): 5.
Caplain discusses three topics: he disputes a statement from The Mammoth Book of Killer Women that calls the Fall River of 1892 “an ugly but productive town of some 75,000 people”; he notes that the original production of Lizzie of Fall River has been given an extended run a the Company Theater in Norwell, MA.; and offers some brief biographical information on Elizabeth Engstrom, author of Lizzie Borden.

Chapman, Sherry. “You Know You’re Really a Bordenite When . . .” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.4 (October 2001): 8.
Humorous piece that offers up witty ending to the title’s lead-in.

Duniho, Terence and Stefani Koorey. “Will the Real Inquest Testimony of Lizzie Borden Please Stand Up.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.4 (October 2001): 1, 10-14.
Article that compares the various “versions” of Lizzie’s Inquest testimony as printed in books and web sites devoted to the case and notes the vast discrepancies in accuracy amongst them. Primarily comparing the transcripts that appeared in the Providence Daily Journal and New Bedford Evening Standard, Duniho and Koorey conclude that the Evening Standard version is most accurate and should be used as the truest copy of Lizzie’s words during her Inquest testimony, the only time Lizzie ever spoke publicly about the case.

Noe, Denise. “Letters to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.4 (October 2001): 3.
Noe questions whether Jennie Brownell, referred to in Spiering’s Lizzie, whom Lizzie was visiting before the murders, is the same person as Helen Brownell, whom Emma was visiting during the time the crimes were committed.

Rebello, Leonard. “Letters to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.4 (October 2001): 3, 14.
Rebello answers the questions posed by Denise Noe in the same issue’s “Letters to the Editor,” saying that Helen and Jennie are two different people. He additionally offers specific details as to their lineage.

Savery, Florence J. “Letters to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.4 (October 2001): 14-15.
Savery offers her support to Dr. Paul Hoffman’s theory as to how Lizzie might have spent “the crucial 20 minutes.” Hoffman’s original article appeared in the LBQ in July 2001.

“The Trial Testimony of Mr. John Vinnicum Morse.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.4 (October 2001): 9, 22-23.
First portion of Morse’s trial testimony is reproduced here. Photograph of Morse accompanies the text.

Zawadski, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly VIII.4 (October 2001): 4.
In her list of Borden favorites, Zawadski reviews the following titles: A Private Disgrace: Lizzie Borden by Daylight by Victoria Lincoln, Miss Lizzie by Walter Satterwait, “To Lizzie” (poem) by A. L. Bixby, and the lyrics to “You Can’t Chop Your Poppa Up in Massachusetts” by Michael Brown.

Vol. IX, No. 1, January 2002

Binette, Dennis A. “Fall River Historical Society News.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.1 (January 2002): 3, 8.
Reprinted from “The Fall River Historical Society Report” of Fall 2001, this article discusses the additions to the FRHS’s collection and summarizes recent media coverage of the case.

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.1 (January 2002): 20-21.
Essay devoted to Holden Borden, the first tycoon of “the mighty industrial empire” of Fall River, and a distant ancestor of Lizzie’s through John Borden.

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizzie Borden in the Spotlight, Once Again.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.1 (January 2002): 8.
Caplain examines the critical success of the Christopher McGovern and Amy Powers musical Lizzie Borden at the Goodspeed. A reproduction of the first page of the playbill accompanies the text.

Noe, Denise. “Lizbeth’s Cause: The Animal Rescue League.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.1 (January 2002): 7.
Noe details the history of the Fall River Animal Rescue League, to which Lizzie had named primary beneficiary in her will. A photograph of Lizzie Borden’s pet’s headstone accompanies the text.

Pavao, William L. “Abby Durfee Borden: Portrait of a Stepmother.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.1 (January 2002): 10-20.
Lengthy portrait of the personality and life of Abby Durfee Gray Borden, by the curator of the Lizzie Borden Bed and Breakfast Museum. Two photographs of Abby, one of Sarah, one of Bridget, and one of Abby dead, accompany the text.

Rebello, Leonard. “The Whitehead House Discovered.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.1 (January 2002): 6, 21-23.
Interesting investigative essay detailing Rebello’s quest to document the existence and location of the Fourth Street property. A portion of the Fall River map from 1895 with the location of the Whitehead house accompanies the text, along with a photograph of the house as it looks today.

“The Trial Testimony of Mr. John Vinnicum Morse—Part II.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.1 (January 2002): 9, 13.
Second installment of the trial testimony of John Morse.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “The Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.1 (January 2002): 4.
Reviews of some of Zawadzki’s favorites: Lizzie Borden: Past and Present by Len Rebello, “The Ma and Pa Murders” in Great Unsolved Crimes by Louis Solomon, (her favorite examples of bad facts) Great American Mysteries and The Good, The Bad, The Mad, both by E. Randall Floyd. For the “Best Opening Line in Any Borden Book” she singles out “Did Lizzie Do It?” from A New England Sampler by Eleanor Early.

Vol. IX, No. 2, April 2002

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.2 (April 2002): 5, 19-20.
Short items covering the reports of ghostly sightings at the Lizzie Borden Bed and Breakfast and the difference between the three edifices in Fall River that bear the name Borden (Borden Block, A. J. Borden Building, and Borden Mills). Most interesting are the details Caplain provides listing the occupants of the A. J. Borden Building through time.

Chapman, Sherry. “Borden Banter,” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.2 (April 2002): 6.
Humorous piece by “resident Borden humorist” Chapman. A cartoon of pears accompanies the text.

Chapman, Sherry. “Dear Abby?” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.2 (April 2002): 7.
Article on Abby Borden that further supports William Pavao’s headline piece in the January 2002 issue of the Quarterly, attempting to humanize Lizzie’s stepmother and dispelling the long-held portrayal of her as a wicked and mean woman. Large portrait photo of Abby accompanies the text.

Duniho, Terence. “Arthur Phillips’ Perspective on Lizzie.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.2 (April 2002): 18-19.
Duniho explored Arthur Sherman Phillips’ role in the Borden case as a junior member of the defense and investigates the authenticity of the essay bearing his name that was thought to first appear in the 1944 volume of Phillips History of Fall River. Even though some of the facts in Phillips’ work are incorrect, Duniho concludes that he was indeed the article’s author.

Duniho, Terence. “A Visit to 92 Second Street and Environs.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.2 (April 2002): 9, 21-23.
Duniho offers a narrative of his experiences in visiting the Borden home. A photo of the house as it looks today as well as a photo of the hidden side of the house now blocked by Leary press accompanies the text.

Jubinville, Richard. “Letters to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.2 (April 2002): 3.
Brief letter announcing Jubinville’s intention to renew his subscription to the Quarterly for two years.

Noe, Denise. “Why Lizzie Will Forever Haunt.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.2 (April 2002): 8, 20-21.
Noe examines the reasons why, after 110 years, the Borden case “will continue to haunt the world” and why she “has taken hold on the public’s imagination.”

Robson, Ann. “Letters to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.2 (April 2002): 3.
Brief letter praising the Quarterly and announcing the writer’s intention to renew her subscription.

“The Trial Testimony of Mr. John Vinnicum Morse—Part III.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.2 (April 2002): 10-17.
Third installment of the trial testimony of John Morse.

Widdows, Harry. Excerpt from a letter. Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.2 (April 2002): 3.
Widdows remarks on the Volume I Index cover page from the Preliminary Hearing, saying that his copy has one. Editor Bertolet replies that Widdows is correct and the Volume I Index cover sheet was mistakenly left out of the Quarterly’s copy of the trial.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.2 (April 2002): 4.
Reviews of “From Lizzie Borden to Lorena Bobbit: Violent Women and Gendered Justice” in Journal of American Studies (Vol. 35) 2001, pages 471-484, by Jean S. Filetti, and “Lizzie Borden” from Shots in the Dark: True Crime Pictures by Gail Buckland.

Vol. IX, No. 3, July 2002

“The Broken Branch: Terence Duniho, November 13, 1940 – Satirdau. April 6, 2002.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.3 (July 2002): 22.
Obituary and tribute to the late Terence Duniho, a Borden aficionado and author.

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.3 (July 2002): 5.
Essay examining the life and career of Arthur Sherman Phillips, author of The Phillips History of Fall River and a junior lawyer from Lizzie’s defense team in 1893.

Doherty, Beau, with contributions by Patricia Doherty Foley and Stefani Koorey. “Patrick H. Doherty.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.3 (July 2002): 1, 12-13.
First person genealogical history of the Doherty family, centering on Patrick H., a Special Officer of the Fall River Police Department who was one of the leads in the Borden murder case.

Fleming, Jack Wayne, contributor. “American Murder Ballads–Friends and Relations.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.3 (July 2002): 3
Excerpts from “American Murder Ballad and Their Stories,” collected and edited by Olive Woolley Burt. Poems relating to the Borden murder and Lizzie Borden are highlighted.

“Patrick H. Doherty — The Obituary.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.3 (July 2002): 7, 23.
Obituary of Patrick Doherty reprinted from an unknown newspaper.

“Patrick Doherty: The Witness Statements.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.3 (July 2002): 8, 19-21, 23.
Part I of transcribed statments from the official Police Witness Statements, taken by Special Officer Patrick Doherty.

Rimer, Jane. “The Room That Lizzie Built.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.3 (July 2002): 9.
First person story of turning a 40-year interest in the Lizzie Borden case into a room decorated with a Borden theme.

“The Trial Testimony of Mr. John Vinnicum Morse—Part IV.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.3 (July 2002): 10-11.
Fourth installment of the trial testimony of John Morse.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.3 (July 2002): 4.
Reviews of Lizzie Borden and the Library Connection by John David marshall (1990), “Elizabeth ‘Lizzie’ Borden” in Mistresses of Mayhem: the Book of Women Criminals by Francine Hornberger (2002), “Lizzie Borden” in Crimes of Passion: An Unblinking Look at Murderous Love by Howard Engel (2001), and “Lizzie Borden” in The Dictionary of Cultural Literacy by E.D. Hirsch.

Vol. IX, No. 4, October 2002

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.4 (October 2002): 5.
Essay examining the production of Nine Pine Street in 1933, starring Lilian Gish.

Chapman, Sherry. “In Pusuit of the Proceedings.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.4 (October 2002): 7, 15-16.
Humorous tale of the twists and turns Ms. Chapman took in her pusuit of a copy of the Proceedings.

Hoffman, Paul Dennis. “A Friendship Destroyed.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.4 (October 2002): 8, 16.
Essay by the author of Yesterday in Old Fall River that explores the relationship between Alice Russell and Lizzie Borden.

Koorey, Stefani. “Lizzie On Line — LizzieAndrewBorden.com.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.4 (October 2002): 6, 14-15.
First person essay on the design consdierations employed when creating the website LizzieAndrewBorden.com.

Martins, Michael and Dennis Binette. “Lizzie’s Turncoat Friend.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.4 (October 2002): 1, 12.
Reprint of article written by the curator and assistant curator of the Fall River Historical Society, originally published in the Society’s newsletter, on a new photograph of the aged Alice Russell, Lizzie Borden’s friend.

“Patrick Doherty: The Witness Statements.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.4 (October 2002): 10-12.
Part II of transcribed statments from the official Police Witness Statements, taken by Special Officer Patrick Doherty.

Roach, Marilynne K. “Letters to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.4 (October 2002): 3.
Letter announcing the publication of the author’s new book The Salem Witch Trials: A Day-by-Day Chronicle of a Community Under Siege.

“The Trial Testimony of Alice M. Russell—Part I.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.4 (October 2002): 9, 16-23.
First installment of the trial testimony of Alice Russell.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. IX.4 (October 2002): 4.
Reviews of “The New Sensation: I Have Found Lizzie Borden’s Hatchet,” a story that appeared in 1893 in the Daily News, “Most Famous ‘Murderer’ Who Was Never Found Guilty from Hellraisers, Heroines, and Holy Women by Jean F. Blashfield (1981), “Miss Lizzie Borden” from Women Are Here to Stay: The Durable Sex in Its Infinite Variety Through a Half a Century of American Life by Agnes Rogers (1949), and It’s An Old New England Custom by Edwin Valentine Mitchell (1946).

Vol. X, No. 1, January 2003

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.1 (January 2003): 5.
Short items covering Dorothy Parker’s comments on Lizzie Borden, the price of certain times in “Lizzie’s Day,” a new brochure on the Borden sites in Fall River prepared by teh Fall River Office of Tourism, and the author’s ruminations on the Centennial Lizzie Borde Conference of 1992.

Curry, Judith Paula. “Nance O’Neil — Revisited.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.1 (January 2003): 1, 14-17.
Biographical essay of the great tragedienne Nance O’Neil who was also a friend of Lizzie Borden’s.

“The Known Films of Nance O’Neil.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.1 (January 2003): 15.
List of 35 films, from the years 1915-1935 that contained Nance O’Neil.

Koorey, Stefani. “Lizzie On Line.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.1 (January 2003): 6. 17,
Essay exploring the various online sources for information about Lizzie Borden and the Borden murders of 1892.

Lussier, Tim. “The Lubin Film Company.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.1 (January 2003): 10-11, 19-21.
History of the Lubin Film Company, a silent film production studio.

Martins, Michael and Dennis Binette. “Charles Henry Wells: An Insider Speaks of Lizzie.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.1 (January 2003): 7, 17-18.
Introduction to and reprint of an essay, written in the third person, by Charles Wells on his first-hand encounters and memories of Lizzie Borden.

Pederson, Carol. “Letters to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.1 (January 2003): 3, 23.
Pederson relates her teaching methodologies in the design of her one night adult education class on the Borden murders of 1892.

Rebello, Leonard and Neilson Caplain. “Joe Carpenter: Was He the One?” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.1 (January 2003): 8, 18-19.
Essay investigating the feasibility of Joseph Carpenter being the guilty party in the Borden murders.

“The Trial Testimony of Alice M. Russell—Part II.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.1 (January 2003): 12-13, 20, 22-23.
Second installment of the trial testimony of Alice Russell.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.1 (January 2003): 4, 17.
Zawaskii reviews various children’s literature sources on the Borden murders, including The Lizzie Borden Trial by Doreen Rappaport (1992), Lizzie Borden ‘Axe Murder’ Trial: A Headline Case by Joan Axelrod-Contrada (2000), The Borden Tragedy, a graphic novel, by Rick Geary (1997), “The Ma & Pa Murders: The Lizzie Borden Case” from The Ma and Pa Murders Other Perfect Crimes by Louis Solomon (1976), Anita Gustafson’s “Could a Woman Do That?” from Guilty or Innocent (1988), “The Fall River Murders” from Crime Mysteries by Barbara Adams (1988), Bizarre Murders by Melvin Berger (1983), and Mysterious Persons in History: Baffling Cases of Unsolved Mysteries by Fred Neff.

Vol. X, No. 2, April 2003

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.2 (April 2003): 5.
Examination of the University of Massachusetts web site, Historical Investigation into the Past: Lizzie Borden/Fall River Case Study.

Chapman, Sherry. “Top Twelve Reasons for Lizzie’s Acquittal.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.1 (January 2003): 7.
Witty piece by “Resident Borden Humorist” Sherry Chapman.

Disselkoen, Mel. “Joseph Carpenter: Once More With Feeling.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.2 (April 2003): 10, 19.
Inspired by the January 2003 article on Mr. Carpenter as a possible suspect in the Borden murders of 1892, Mr. Disselkoen offers his reasoning for the serious inclusion of Carpenter to the suspects list.

Fletcher, Paul. Trial By Theory: The Lizzie Borden Mystery. An Original Docu-Drama Containing Theories by Just About Everybody. Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.2 (April 2003): 12-13, 19-23.

Gutowski, Bob. “Letters to the Editor.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.2 (April 2003): 3.
Short mention is made of a possible connection between the Lizzie Borden case and the character names in Eugene O’Neil’s Mourning Becomes Electra.

Koorey, Stefani. “Lizzie On Line.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.2 (April 2003): 6, 16.
Essay exploring the various online sources for information about Lizzie Borden and the Borden murders of 1892.

Ryckebusch, Jules. “Ah Yes! I Remember It Well.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.2 (April 2003): 1, 14-15.
Former publisher of the Lizzie Borden Quarterly, Professor Jules Ryckebusch relates the history of the publication that grew out of the 1992 Centenial Lizzie Borden Conference.

“The Trial Testimony of Alice M. Russell—Part III.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.2 (April 2003): 8-9, 17-19.
Third and final installment of the trial testimony of Alice Russell.

Widdows, Harry. “The Jefferson Borden Affair.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.2 (April 2003): 11, 16-17.
Interesting essay about the history of the mutiny of the crew members of the schooner Jefferson Borden. It was at one time believed that the murder of Andrew and Abby Borden was somehow connected to this event. Widdow’s work sets the record straight.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.2 (April 2003): 4.
Reviews of Barbara Kirwin’s The Mad, the Bad, and the Innocent: The Criminal Mind on Trial (1997), “Lizzie Borden” from World Famous Acquittals by Charles Franklin (1970), The Life of the Law: The People and Cases That Have Shaped Our Society, From King Alfred to Rodney King by Alfred H. Knight (1996), and Tad Tuleja’s “Who Killed Lizzie Borden’s Parents?” from Fabulous Fallacies.

Vol. X, No. 3, July 2003

Caplain Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.3 (July 2003): 5, 18.
History of the Second District Court House in Fall River, the location of Lizzie Borden’s initial arrest and her inquest testimony.

Chapman, Sherry. “Lizzie Laughables.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.3 (July 2003): 7.
Humorous list of 20 “things that make me go hmm” that relate to the Lizzie Borden saga.

Fletcher, Paul. Trial By Theory: The Lizzie Borden Mystery. An Original Docu-Drama Containing Theories by Just About Everybody. Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.3 (July 2003): 9, 19-23.

Holba, Annette. “Shattering the Myth.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.3 (July 2003): 1, 10-18.
Holba looks at the crime, the investigation, and the official inquest testimony of Lizzie Borden through the lens of Kenneth Burke’s theory of form and dimensions of his pentad.

Koorey, Stefani. “Lizzie On Line.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.3 (July 2003): 6, 18-19.
A survey of online auctions of Lizzie Borden collectibles, including a how-to on buying and selling on eBay.

Masterton, William L. “Abby’s Mysterious Note: Now You See It, Now You Don’t.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.3 (July 2003): 8, 19.
A study of the mysterious note that Abby Borden supposedly received the morning of the murders, calling her to visit a sick friend.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.3 (July 2003): 4.
Reviews of “The Lizzie Borden Case (1878-1899)” from American Eras (1997), Trina Robbins’ Forty Whacks (2003), and “If You Love One: Cancer Woman” from Born On a Rotten Day: Illuminating the Dark Side of the Zodiac by Hazel Dixon-Cooper (2003).

Vol. X, No. 4, October 2003

Bertolet, Maynard. “Goodbye Lizzie Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.4 (October 2003): 1, 18-19.
Farewell essay by the editor of the Lizzie Borden Quarterly, announcing the ending of its publication.

Caplain, Neilson. “Lizbits.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.4 (October 2003): 5, 19-20.
A genealogical examination of Lizzie Borden’s lineage.

Fletcher, Paul. Trial By Theory: The Lizzie Borden Mystery. An Original Docu-Drama Containing Theories by Just About Everybody. Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.4 (October 2003): 8-18.

Koorey, Stefani. “Lizzie On Line.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.4 (October 2003): 6, 20-21.
A survey of online sources for scary/Halloween references and stories on the subject of the Borden murders of 1892 and Lizzie Borden.

Masterton, William L. “Abby’s Mysterious Note: Now You See It, Now You Don’t.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.4 (October 2003): 7, 21-23.
Replies to Dr. Masterton’s theory regarding Abby’s mysterious note from the previous issue. Contributors include Marilynne K. Roach, Susan W. Smith, Florence J. Savery, and Brenda Bright.

Zawadzki, Lisa. “Bibliographic Borden.” Lizzie Borden Quarterly Vol. X.4 (October 2003):4, 19.
Reviews of “Newspapers’ Ancient Nectar,” an editorial by Froma Harrop from the Providence Journal (1997), “Renovating Lizzie and O.J.”, also by Harrop for the Providence Journal (2000), “Lizzie Borden,” from The World’s Worst Murderers, by Charles Franklin (1965), and Katherine Ramsland’s The Criminal Mind: A Writer’s Guide to Forensic Psychology (2002).